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TITLE
Temple Pier, Loch Ness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0292
PLACENAME
Drumnadrochit
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32196
KEYWORDS
piers
Urquhart Castle
puffers
steam ships
vessels
boats
paddle steamers
postcards
Caledonian Canal
John Cobb
water speed record attempt
castles
Temple Pier, Loch Ness

This postcard shows puffers at Temple Pier, by the shores of Loch Ness. In the background is Urquhart Castle.

Several expeditions have been run from Temple Pier, including the John Cobb water speed record attempt and the Rines expeditions of 1972, underwater photographic endeavours to prove or disprove the existence of a monster.

Puffers were the sea-going equivalent of delivery vehicles, in the days before large-scale road transport. When the Caledonian Canal opened in the 1820s, fishing boats, passenger vessels and cargo boats would daily travel along the length of Loch Ness. Victorian paddle steamers could often carry over 1000 passengers. As traffic increased on Loch Ness, several piers were built around the loch. Today, they are disused and gradually disappearing

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Temple Pier, Loch Ness

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1920s

piers; Urquhart Castle; puffers; steam ships; vessels; boats; paddle steamers; postcards; Caledonian Canal; John Cobb; water speed record attempt; castles

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows puffers at Temple Pier, by the shores of Loch Ness. In the background is Urquhart Castle.<br /> <br /> Several expeditions have been run from Temple Pier, including the John Cobb water speed record attempt and the Rines expeditions of 1972, underwater photographic endeavours to prove or disprove the existence of a monster.<br /> <br /> Puffers were the sea-going equivalent of delivery vehicles, in the days before large-scale road transport. When the Caledonian Canal opened in the 1820s, fishing boats, passenger vessels and cargo boats would daily travel along the length of Loch Ness. Victorian paddle steamers could often carry over 1000 passengers. As traffic increased on Loch Ness, several piers were built around the loch. Today, they are disused and gradually disappearing