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TITLE
Ruthven Castle, Kingussie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0294
PLACENAME
Kingussie
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
PERIOD
1910s; 1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32198
KEYWORDS
castles
barracks
Jacobites
Comyns
Wolf of Badenoch
General Wade
Battle of Culloden
postcards
Prince Charles Edward Stuart
Stuarts
Stewarts
Ruthven Castle, Kingussie

This postcard is titled 'Ruthven Castle' but shows Ruthven Barracks, located 1.1 km south of the village of Kingussie.

Ruthven Barracks, completed in 1724, was built on the site of Ruthven Castle. The castle is thought to have been a stronghold of the Comyn Lords of Badenoch and of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan, known as the 'Wolf of Badenoch'. In 1451 the castle was acquired by Alexander Gordon, Earl of Huntly and in 1590 was rebuilt by the 6th Earl of Huntly. During the Jacobite rising of 1689, the castle was burned by Jacobite forces led by John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee.

In the aftermath of the Jacobite rebellion of 1715 the Hanoverian government resolved to strengthen their military presence in the Highlands. Alongside their existing forts at Inverness and Fort William, three barracks were built in the Highlands: at Ruthven, at Bernera at the mouth of Glenelg and at Kiliwhimen at the western end of Loch Ness. A fourth barracks was built at Inversnaid beside Loch Lomond, on the main route into the Highlands.

The tallest buildings seen in the image are the barrack blocks, which faced each other across a square and could house 120 men, although it is thought that Ruthven Barracks never held its full number of troops. In 1734 a guard house and stable block were added to the complex, seen to the left of this image.

In 1745, a Sergeant Molloy and 12 men successfully defended Ruthven Barracks against a force of about 200 Jacobites. However, the Barracks had no defence against artillery, and this was exposed in 1746 when Jacobites forces, armed with artillery, overwhelmed Ruthven in 1746 and burned it. In the aftermath of Culloden, Jacobite forces rallied at Ruthven but were instructed by Charles Edward Stuart to disperse.

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Ruthven Castle, Kingussie

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

1910s; 1920s

castles; barracks; Jacobites; Comyns; Wolf of Badenoch; General Wade; Battle of Culloden; postcards; Prince Charles Edward Stuart; Stuarts; Stewarts

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard is titled 'Ruthven Castle' but shows Ruthven Barracks, located 1.1 km south of the village of Kingussie. <br /> <br /> Ruthven Barracks, completed in 1724, was built on the site of Ruthven Castle. The castle is thought to have been a stronghold of the Comyn Lords of Badenoch and of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan, known as the 'Wolf of Badenoch'. In 1451 the castle was acquired by Alexander Gordon, Earl of Huntly and in 1590 was rebuilt by the 6th Earl of Huntly. During the Jacobite rising of 1689, the castle was burned by Jacobite forces led by John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee.<br /> <br /> In the aftermath of the Jacobite rebellion of 1715 the Hanoverian government resolved to strengthen their military presence in the Highlands. Alongside their existing forts at Inverness and Fort William, three barracks were built in the Highlands: at Ruthven, at Bernera at the mouth of Glenelg and at Kiliwhimen at the western end of Loch Ness. A fourth barracks was built at Inversnaid beside Loch Lomond, on the main route into the Highlands.<br /> <br /> The tallest buildings seen in the image are the barrack blocks, which faced each other across a square and could house 120 men, although it is thought that Ruthven Barracks never held its full number of troops. In 1734 a guard house and stable block were added to the complex, seen to the left of this image. <br /> <br /> In 1745, a Sergeant Molloy and 12 men successfully defended Ruthven Barracks against a force of about 200 Jacobites. However, the Barracks had no defence against artillery, and this was exposed in 1746 when Jacobites forces, armed with artillery, overwhelmed Ruthven in 1746 and burned it. In the aftermath of Culloden, Jacobite forces rallied at Ruthven but were instructed by Charles Edward Stuart to disperse.