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TITLE
Souters o' Cromarty
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0350
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF IMAGE
1905
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32263
KEYWORDS
postcards
headlands
giants
firths
navy
Souters o' Cromarty

This postcard from1905 shows the Sutors of Cromarty.

Two headlands, the North and South Sutors guard the entrance to the Cromarty Firth.
The Sutors are said to be named after two giants who lived on the headlands and watched over the people of Cromarty. They were hard working shoemakers who used to throw tools to each other across the narrow strait.

The Cromarty Firth is an inlet of the Moray Firth. Formed at the same time as Loch Ness it is a deep natural harbour. In 1912 it became a naval base and provided a safe anchorage for the fleet in both world wars. The entrance to the Firth was easily protected and the Sutors bristled with military fortifications the remains of which can still be seen. More recently the Cromarty Firth has been used for the construction and repair and mothballing of North Sea oil rigs.

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Souters o' Cromarty

ROSS: Cromarty

1900s

postcards; headlands; giants; firths; navy

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard from1905 shows the Sutors of Cromarty.<br /> <br /> Two headlands, the North and South Sutors guard the entrance to the Cromarty Firth.<br /> The Sutors are said to be named after two giants who lived on the headlands and watched over the people of Cromarty. They were hard working shoemakers who used to throw tools to each other across the narrow strait. <br /> <br /> The Cromarty Firth is an inlet of the Moray Firth. Formed at the same time as Loch Ness it is a deep natural harbour. In 1912 it became a naval base and provided a safe anchorage for the fleet in both world wars. The entrance to the Firth was easily protected and the Sutors bristled with military fortifications the remains of which can still be seen. More recently the Cromarty Firth has been used for the construction and repair and mothballing of North Sea oil rigs.