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TITLE
Ben Wyvis and West End Dingwall
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0380
PLACENAME
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Dingwall
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32297
KEYWORDS
postcards
mountains
towns
castles
harbours
canals
Ben Wyvis and West End Dingwall

This postcard shows Ben Wyvis and the west end of Dingwall

Ben Wyvis, at 3430 feet, is the largest and highest mountain on the east of Scotland north of Inverness. Wyvis possibly derives from the Gaelic "fhuathais" which could have a number of meanings - terror, awesome, high, noble, spectral. This great mountain is all of these. In the eastern corries snow lies for many months and when the Mackenzies held the land from the King it was on the condition that they could produce a snowball whenever it was demanded.

Dingwall, the county town for Ross and Cromarty, is situated at the head of the Cromarty Firth. Macbeth is believed to have been born in the castle here in 1005. The Norse leader Thorfin established his "seat of justice" or "thing vollr" here and gave Dingwall its name. Alexander II created Dingwall a royal burgh in 1227. The Earls of Ross ruled here until the fifteenth century when the last earl was involved in a failed attempt to overthrow the throne and the title reverted to the Crown.

Dingwall declined in the seventeenth century and the castle was demolished in 1818. Fortunes improved with the building of a harbour by Thomas Telford. A canal was also built but quickly fell in to disuse. The coming of the railway in 1862 brought more prosperity. The town developed as a market town and agricultural centre with a permanent livestock mart.

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Ben Wyvis and West End Dingwall

ROSS: Dingwall

1900s

postcards; mountains; towns; castles; harbours; canals

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Ben Wyvis and the west end of Dingwall<br /> <br /> Ben Wyvis, at 3430 feet, is the largest and highest mountain on the east of Scotland north of Inverness. Wyvis possibly derives from the Gaelic "fhuathais" which could have a number of meanings - terror, awesome, high, noble, spectral. This great mountain is all of these. In the eastern corries snow lies for many months and when the Mackenzies held the land from the King it was on the condition that they could produce a snowball whenever it was demanded.<br /> <br /> Dingwall, the county town for Ross and Cromarty, is situated at the head of the Cromarty Firth. Macbeth is believed to have been born in the castle here in 1005. The Norse leader Thorfin established his "seat of justice" or "thing vollr" here and gave Dingwall its name. Alexander II created Dingwall a royal burgh in 1227. The Earls of Ross ruled here until the fifteenth century when the last earl was involved in a failed attempt to overthrow the throne and the title reverted to the Crown.<br /> <br /> Dingwall declined in the seventeenth century and the castle was demolished in 1818. Fortunes improved with the building of a harbour by Thomas Telford. A canal was also built but quickly fell in to disuse. The coming of the railway in 1862 brought more prosperity. The town developed as a market town and agricultural centre with a permanent livestock mart.