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TITLE
Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. Head of Procession, Dingwall
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0382
PLACENAME
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Dingwall
DATE OF IMAGE
1937
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32299
KEYWORDS
postcards
towns
parades
coronation
hotels
almshouses
Royalty
Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. Head of Procession, Dingwall

This postcard from May 12th 1937 shows the procession in Dingwall marking the Coronation of George VI.

The procession is making its way along the High Street past the Royal Hotel. At the head is Bailie Tom Maclean who presided over the celebrations, Provost John Macrae having been "commanded by the King" to be present in London.

Alongside Bailie Maclean are the Police under CC William Maclean. They are followed by the pipes and drums of the 4/5th Seaforth Highlanders and the 4/5th Seaforth Highlanders. Behind are the British Legion, the Boys Brigade, Boy Scouts and Wolf Cubs, Rovers, Girl Guides and Brownies, the League of Health and Beauty, the "Star of Ross-shire" Lodge of Oddfellows, Magistrates and members of Dingwall Town Council, halbediers, 600 schoolchildren and finally members of the public.

Proceedings had begun with a religious service in front of the Town House. The ceremony in London was broadcast from large speakers on the balcony. The parade then made its way to Victoria Park where sports were held. Pupils at the Academy were presented with a Coronation New Testament and every child received a Coronation Box containing a slab of chocolate.

In the evening there was a fancy dress parade, a bonfire and fireworks in Jubilee Park and a dance in the Town House.

The personal maid to the new Queen, Miss Catherine "Catta" Maclean, came from Dingwall. Daughter of a local building contractor she had attended Dingwall Academy before entering the service of the Countess of Strathmore, mother of the Queen.

The mid-Victorian Royal Hotel, built on the site of the old almshouse, was formerly known as the Gladstone Building. The mother of William Gladstone, four times Prime Minister of Great Britain was born in Dingwall. Gladstone was given the Freedom of Dingwall in 1853.

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Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. Head of Procession, Dingwall

ROSS: Dingwall

1930s

postcards; towns; parades; coronation; hotels; almshouses; Royalty

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard from May 12th 1937 shows the procession in Dingwall marking the Coronation of George VI.<br /> <br /> The procession is making its way along the High Street past the Royal Hotel. At the head is Bailie Tom Maclean who presided over the celebrations, Provost John Macrae having been "commanded by the King" to be present in London. <br /> <br /> Alongside Bailie Maclean are the Police under CC William Maclean. They are followed by the pipes and drums of the 4/5th Seaforth Highlanders and the 4/5th Seaforth Highlanders. Behind are the British Legion, the Boys Brigade, Boy Scouts and Wolf Cubs, Rovers, Girl Guides and Brownies, the League of Health and Beauty, the "Star of Ross-shire" Lodge of Oddfellows, Magistrates and members of Dingwall Town Council, halbediers, 600 schoolchildren and finally members of the public.<br /> <br /> Proceedings had begun with a religious service in front of the Town House. The ceremony in London was broadcast from large speakers on the balcony. The parade then made its way to Victoria Park where sports were held. Pupils at the Academy were presented with a Coronation New Testament and every child received a Coronation Box containing a slab of chocolate.<br /> <br /> In the evening there was a fancy dress parade, a bonfire and fireworks in Jubilee Park and a dance in the Town House.<br /> <br /> The personal maid to the new Queen, Miss Catherine "Catta" Maclean, came from Dingwall. Daughter of a local building contractor she had attended Dingwall Academy before entering the service of the Countess of Strathmore, mother of the Queen.<br /> <br /> The mid-Victorian Royal Hotel, built on the site of the old almshouse, was formerly known as the Gladstone Building. The mother of William Gladstone, four times Prime Minister of Great Britain was born in Dingwall. Gladstone was given the Freedom of Dingwall in 1853.