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TITLE
Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. High Street, Dingwall
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0385
PLACENAME
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Dingwall
DATE OF IMAGE
1937
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32304
KEYWORDS
postcards
towns
parades
coronation
Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. High Street, Dingwall

This postcard from May 12th 1937 shows the High Street in Dingwall on the occasion of the Coronation of George IV

As in towns and villages across the land the streets and buildings of Dingwall have been decorated with flags, bunting and streamers.

The building in the middle is the Town House. Dingwall's original town house was built in 1732-33 by mason William MacNeil. The tower was added in 1773-4. It was designed by John Boog who had sought inspiration from the Tollbooth Steeple in Forres. The square tower topped with a wooden copula housed the town jail. In 1902-6 the town house was rebuilt by William C. Joass, the copula was replaced with a taller one and the balcony was added. It provided offices for the council. It is now the home of Dingwall's museum

Bailie Tom Maclean presided over the celebrations, Provost John Macrae having been "commanded by the King" to be present in London. Proceedings began with a religious service in front of the Town House. The ceremony in London was broadcast from large speakers on the balcony. There was parade through the town to Victoria Park where sports were held. Pupils at the Academy were presented with a Coronation New Testament and every child received a Coronation Box containing a slab of chocolate.
In the evening there was a fancy dress parade, a bonfire and fireworks in Jubilee Park and a dance in the Town House.

The personal maid to the new Queen, Miss Catherine "Catta" Maclean, came from Dingwall. Daughter of a local building contractor she had attended Dingwall Academy before entering the service of the Countess of Strathmore, mother of the Queen

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Coronation of George VI, May 12th 1937. High Street, Dingwall

ROSS: Dingwall

1930s

postcards; towns; parades; coronation

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard from May 12th 1937 shows the High Street in Dingwall on the occasion of the Coronation of George IV<br /> <br /> As in towns and villages across the land the streets and buildings of Dingwall have been decorated with flags, bunting and streamers.<br /> <br /> The building in the middle is the Town House. Dingwall's original town house was built in 1732-33 by mason William MacNeil. The tower was added in 1773-4. It was designed by John Boog who had sought inspiration from the Tollbooth Steeple in Forres. The square tower topped with a wooden copula housed the town jail. In 1902-6 the town house was rebuilt by William C. Joass, the copula was replaced with a taller one and the balcony was added. It provided offices for the council. It is now the home of Dingwall's museum<br /> <br /> Bailie Tom Maclean presided over the celebrations, Provost John Macrae having been "commanded by the King" to be present in London. Proceedings began with a religious service in front of the Town House. The ceremony in London was broadcast from large speakers on the balcony. There was parade through the town to Victoria Park where sports were held. Pupils at the Academy were presented with a Coronation New Testament and every child received a Coronation Box containing a slab of chocolate.<br /> In the evening there was a fancy dress parade, a bonfire and fireworks in Jubilee Park and a dance in the Town House.<br /> <br /> The personal maid to the new Queen, Miss Catherine "Catta" Maclean, came from Dingwall. Daughter of a local building contractor she had attended Dingwall Academy before entering the service of the Countess of Strathmore, mother of the Queen