Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Interview with Mary Maclean about the Clydebank Blitz
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF06_TRACK04_MACLEAN
PLACENAME
Glasgow
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Mary Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3231
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
air raid
air raids
air raid shelter
air raid shelters
evacuation
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Mary Maclean was living in Glasgow at the time of the Clydebank Blitz.

I think it was into the second year of the war that the town beside us in Glasgow, Clydebank, it was very, very badly bombed and I can remember - Will I tell you about the night, the two nights that Clydebank - I think I told - the Clydebank town was practically razed to the ground. It was very, very sad. We had just got into our beds, about eight o'clock, and all of a sudden this siren screeched out all over Glasgow and that was warning people that the German planes were fast approaching. And we knew that they would be just absolutely laden with bombs. So, I can remember my father shouting to us and saying, 'Come on. Hurry up. Get up, get up. Get your clothes on. Back again.' And we thought this was great excitement that they were allowed back again and we had to go downstairs into a shelter and we were there all night till about three o'clock or four o'clock in the morning. There was a beautiful moonlight night and that, the previous afternoon, people in the street used to say, 'Oh, this is a bad, this'll be a bad night for the bombing. It's such a lovely, clear night and the planes could see where they were going.' So we sat in this shelter all night listening to the bombs falling, because Clydebank was just a few miles away from where I stayed. And we could hear the police cars and the Fire Brigade and the ambulances. So that was two nights. Thousands of people were killed in Clydebank and many, many more were left homeless. And we were fortunate that our house wasn't struck but lots of the houses round about us, their windows were shattered or broken and the shop windows were broken too. And we could see the, all the lorries passing along the road with people in the lorries. They were just piled into the lorries and they were taken away to a safer place out of Glasgow, into the country. So that's two particular nights of the war that I remember.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Portree Primary School.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Interview with Mary Maclean about the Clydebank Blitz

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; air raid; air raids; air raid shelter; air raid shelters; evacuation; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Mary Maclean was living in Glasgow at the time of the Clydebank Blitz.<br /> <br /> I think it was into the second year of the war that the town beside us in Glasgow, Clydebank, it was very, very badly bombed and I can remember - Will I tell you about the night, the two nights that Clydebank - I think I told - the Clydebank town was practically razed to the ground. It was very, very sad. We had just got into our beds, about eight o'clock, and all of a sudden this siren screeched out all over Glasgow and that was warning people that the German planes were fast approaching. And we knew that they would be just absolutely laden with bombs. So, I can remember my father shouting to us and saying, 'Come on. Hurry up. Get up, get up. Get your clothes on. Back again.' And we thought this was great excitement that they were allowed back again and we had to go downstairs into a shelter and we were there all night till about three o'clock or four o'clock in the morning. There was a beautiful moonlight night and that, the previous afternoon, people in the street used to say, 'Oh, this is a bad, this'll be a bad night for the bombing. It's such a lovely, clear night and the planes could see where they were going.' So we sat in this shelter all night listening to the bombs falling, because Clydebank was just a few miles away from where I stayed. And we could hear the police cars and the Fire Brigade and the ambulances. So that was two nights. Thousands of people were killed in Clydebank and many, many more were left homeless. And we were fortunate that our house wasn't struck but lots of the houses round about us, their windows were shattered or broken and the shop windows were broken too. And we could see the, all the lorries passing along the road with people in the lorries. They were just piled into the lorries and they were taken away to a safer place out of Glasgow, into the country. So that's two particular nights of the war that I remember. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Portree Primary School.