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TITLE
Fortrose looking to Golf Course
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0432
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32352
KEYWORDS
postcards
peninsulas
moraine
cathedrals
towns
charters
schools
ferries
lighthouses
witchcraft
seers
golf
dolphins
harbours
railways
bridges
Fortrose looking to Golf Course

This postcard shows Fortrose looking to the golf course

The town of Fortrose is situated on the south coast of the Black Isle overlooking the Moray Firth.

Projecting a mile in to the firth is the peninsula of Chanonry Ness which is believed to be a moraine, a pile of boulders and rocks, deposited during the Ice Age. In the distance is the coast of Inverness-shire.

On the left is the Parish Church, designed by John Robertson and built in 1895-98. On the right, in the centre of the town, are the ruins of Fortrose Cathedral. Behind the Cathedral is the small round tower, with its conical roof, of Fortrose Academy also designed by John Robertson and built in 1890. In the foreground is the roof of the station.

The Cathedral was founded in the thirteenth century and the Bishop of Ross had his residence here. Around the Cathedral the canons, the priests who served the Cathedral, built their manses. The old name for the town was Chanonry - the Place of the Canons.

In 1444 a charter granted by King James II united Chanonry with its more ancient neighbour Rosemarkie under the common name of Fortross now Fortrose. By 1584 Fortrose had a grammar school and the town flourished as a centre of the arts and sciences especially law and divinity. However by the time of the Reformation the Cathedral was already in a state of disrepair and much of its red sandstone was removed by Oliver Cromwell's army and taken to build his fort at Inverness. Only a small part of the Cathedral remains.

The town remained a seat of learning. Fortrose Academy was established in 1791 and was renowned for its education.

In the nineteenth century steam-vessels carrying goods and passengers stopped at Canonry Point at the end of Chanonry Ness. A regular ferry plied between Chanonry Point and Ardersier on the Inverness-shire coast, the shortest crossing of the Moray Firth, until the 1930s

The lighthouse at Chanonry Point was built by Alan Stevenson in 1846. Near the lighthouse is a memorial stone to the Brahan Seer who was accused of witchcraft by the Countess of Seaforth in 1660 and burned to death here in spiked barrel of tar.
The Ness is now known for more gentle pursuits. The Point is a favourite place to watch bottlenose dolphins and golf has been played on the links since the early 18th century.

A harbour was built in 1817 by Thomas Telford. Communications improved with the opening of the Black Isle railway in 1894. It closed to passengers in 1951. Fortrose is popular with holidaymakers and tourists and the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has brought Inverness within easy reach.

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Fortrose looking to Golf Course

ROSS: Rosemarkie

1930s

postcards; peninsulas; moraine; cathedrals; towns; charters; schools; ferries; lighthouses; witchcraft; seers; golf; dolphins; harbours; railways; bridges

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Fortrose looking to the golf course<br /> <br /> The town of Fortrose is situated on the south coast of the Black Isle overlooking the Moray Firth.<br /> <br /> Projecting a mile in to the firth is the peninsula of Chanonry Ness which is believed to be a moraine, a pile of boulders and rocks, deposited during the Ice Age. In the distance is the coast of Inverness-shire. <br /> <br /> On the left is the Parish Church, designed by John Robertson and built in 1895-98. On the right, in the centre of the town, are the ruins of Fortrose Cathedral. Behind the Cathedral is the small round tower, with its conical roof, of Fortrose Academy also designed by John Robertson and built in 1890. In the foreground is the roof of the station. <br /> <br /> The Cathedral was founded in the thirteenth century and the Bishop of Ross had his residence here. Around the Cathedral the canons, the priests who served the Cathedral, built their manses. The old name for the town was Chanonry - the Place of the Canons.<br /> <br /> In 1444 a charter granted by King James II united Chanonry with its more ancient neighbour Rosemarkie under the common name of Fortross now Fortrose. By 1584 Fortrose had a grammar school and the town flourished as a centre of the arts and sciences especially law and divinity. However by the time of the Reformation the Cathedral was already in a state of disrepair and much of its red sandstone was removed by Oliver Cromwell's army and taken to build his fort at Inverness. Only a small part of the Cathedral remains. <br /> <br /> The town remained a seat of learning. Fortrose Academy was established in 1791 and was renowned for its education.<br /> <br /> In the nineteenth century steam-vessels carrying goods and passengers stopped at Canonry Point at the end of Chanonry Ness. A regular ferry plied between Chanonry Point and Ardersier on the Inverness-shire coast, the shortest crossing of the Moray Firth, until the 1930s<br /> <br /> The lighthouse at Chanonry Point was built by Alan Stevenson in 1846. Near the lighthouse is a memorial stone to the Brahan Seer who was accused of witchcraft by the Countess of Seaforth in 1660 and burned to death here in spiked barrel of tar.<br /> The Ness is now known for more gentle pursuits. The Point is a favourite place to watch bottlenose dolphins and golf has been played on the links since the early 18th century.<br /> <br /> A harbour was built in 1817 by Thomas Telford. Communications improved with the opening of the Black Isle railway in 1894. It closed to passengers in 1951. Fortrose is popular with holidaymakers and tourists and the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has brought Inverness within easy reach.