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TITLE
Interview with Gordon Noble about air raids in Sheffield and Scapa Flow
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF06_TRACK07_NOBLE
PLACENAME
Sheffield; Scapa Flow
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Gordon Noble
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3236
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
bombing
air raid
air raids
audio

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Gordon Noble saw bombing in Sheffield and at Scapa Flow during World War 2.

How did you feel when bombs were dropped near you?

Well, I was explaining that during the war I had stayed in Sheffield during the blitz and there was a tremendous blitz in Sheffield. Lots of Sheffield was reduced to rubble. Water mains burst, unexploded bombs and all that. And it wasn't very pleasant because this was happening and you were wondering what was happening. And one day I was in the shelter under the house, I've explained, having orangeade in a white enamel mug and in the orangeade there was the little segments of orange, you know, the little, and I wasn't used with that, so I thought there must be something wrong with this orangeade. And this bomb went off and blew up the school and blew all our windows and the rust from the corrugated iron that was the roof of the shelter came down and went into my cup, my mug, and I wasn't at all pleased about it. And afterwards, when we went up, the whole sky was a red orange. The whole sky was a red orange. It was a tremendous - impressive's maybe the wrong word, but dramatic scene, you know, the whole thing like that. And sometimes, when the bombs were coming down, we could hear them whistling - whiieeeee bouw - that kind of thing. And, as I say, the school was blown up and it was maybe thirty or forty yards from the house I was staying in. So that was it. But I remember going out to the school and in the ruins of the school there and people picking up shrapnel. That's bits of bombs' casing that burst, and it was like twisted metal and it was still hot in the morning when you would get them in your hand, you know - still hot.

And I also watched the big raid on Scapa Flow, 'cause living in that house, Braehead House, we were standing just outside there and there was a tremendous big raid on Scapa Flow one night - bangs and bombs and you would see the searchlights going up and you would see, they used to put up star-shells. That's a shell that would go up and light up the sky so they would try and pick out the bombers to fire at them. So we remember that one quite distinctly. But the ones that stick more in my mind was when the Germans were dropping bombs on me in Sheffield.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.

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Interview with Gordon Noble about air raids in Sheffield and Scapa Flow

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; bombing; air raid; air raids; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Gordon Noble saw bombing in Sheffield and at Scapa Flow during World War 2.<br /> <br /> How did you feel when bombs were dropped near you?<br /> <br /> Well, I was explaining that during the war I had stayed in Sheffield during the blitz and there was a tremendous blitz in Sheffield. Lots of Sheffield was reduced to rubble. Water mains burst, unexploded bombs and all that. And it wasn't very pleasant because this was happening and you were wondering what was happening. And one day I was in the shelter under the house, I've explained, having orangeade in a white enamel mug and in the orangeade there was the little segments of orange, you know, the little, and I wasn't used with that, so I thought there must be something wrong with this orangeade. And this bomb went off and blew up the school and blew all our windows and the rust from the corrugated iron that was the roof of the shelter came down and went into my cup, my mug, and I wasn't at all pleased about it. And afterwards, when we went up, the whole sky was a red orange. The whole sky was a red orange. It was a tremendous - impressive's maybe the wrong word, but dramatic scene, you know, the whole thing like that. And sometimes, when the bombs were coming down, we could hear them whistling - whiieeeee bouw - that kind of thing. And, as I say, the school was blown up and it was maybe thirty or forty yards from the house I was staying in. So that was it. But I remember going out to the school and in the ruins of the school there and people picking up shrapnel. That's bits of bombs' casing that burst, and it was like twisted metal and it was still hot in the morning when you would get them in your hand, you know - still hot. <br /> <br /> And I also watched the big raid on Scapa Flow, 'cause living in that house, Braehead House, we were standing just outside there and there was a tremendous big raid on Scapa Flow one night - bangs and bombs and you would see the searchlights going up and you would see, they used to put up star-shells. That's a shell that would go up and light up the sky so they would try and pick out the bombers to fire at them. So we remember that one quite distinctly. But the ones that stick more in my mind was when the Germans were dropping bombs on me in Sheffield. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.