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TITLE
Interview with Duncan and Elsie Cormack about the bombing of Wick
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF06_TRACK08_CORMACK
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Duncan & Elsie Cormack
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3238
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
air raid
air raids
evacuation
audio

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Duncan and Elsie Cormack lived in Wick when it was bombed early in World War 2.

Mrs C: We didn't worry about being bombed; we never thought about being bombed. I mean, who's going to bother about Wick, away up in the north of Scotland? Or Thurso? I mean, these things would happen in London, in Glasgow, in all the big cities, you know; not a place like Wick. We never thought on that.

Mr C: No.

Mrs C: But very early in the war, we found that it does happen that way, because the first bomb that was dropped on the mainland of Britain was dropped in Wick on the first of July 1940, where people were killed and that's when I lost my two little sisters, five and nine. Well, then we did know that, what it was about and we did know that they could bomb anywhere. They bombed Wick again in October and there was more children went; other two children were killed then. It was a lot of children killed. And you think, 'That's not fair! It doesn't happen till us. I mean, we're not doing anything till Hitler or till anybody else.' But it was suddenly brought home till us that it does happen. An' I wouldna want it till happen till any of you and I pray to God that it doesn't.

Mr C: Well, Wick was bombed twice, you see, and the second bombing was on, near the aerodrome, so we became involved, our family, my family. There were two bombs dropped on two houses at the edge of the aerodrome and they were blown apart and people were killed and boys - two boys, wasn't it?

Mrs C: A girl and a boy.

Mr C: A girl and a boy were killed.

Mrs C: John and Betty were killed.

Mr C: And another bomb dropped - mind you, we didn't know about this one - another bomb dropped at the end of our street, about a hundred yards from our house and we didn't realise it was there, you see, because it didn't explode. It went into the garden; in fact, it bounced off the end of one house, went across the street and dropped in the garden and the garden had been dug and cultivated, you see, so therefore the earth was soft and the bomb went right in and just the fins sticking out o' the ground. So lo and behold, the police came along and we had to be evacuated. Everybody in the whole street had to be evacuated, so we were evacuees for a day and a night. And the bomb disposal squad from the Army - who were in Wick, of course - and they came up and they defused it. So we got back into the house - this was on the Saturday - we got back into the house on Sunday afternoon and it didn't explode. So that was one of the little episodes, you know, that we had and these little things, you never forget them, never forget them.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.

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Interview with Duncan and Elsie Cormack about the bombing of Wick

CAITHNESS: Wick

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; air raid; air raids; evacuation; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Duncan and Elsie Cormack lived in Wick when it was bombed early in World War 2.<br /> <br /> Mrs C: We didn't worry about being bombed; we never thought about being bombed. I mean, who's going to bother about Wick, away up in the north of Scotland? Or Thurso? I mean, these things would happen in London, in Glasgow, in all the big cities, you know; not a place like Wick. We never thought on that.<br /> <br /> Mr C: No.<br /> <br /> Mrs C: But very early in the war, we found that it does happen that way, because the first bomb that was dropped on the mainland of Britain was dropped in Wick on the first of July 1940, where people were killed and that's when I lost my two little sisters, five and nine. Well, then we did know that, what it was about and we did know that they could bomb anywhere. They bombed Wick again in October and there was more children went; other two children were killed then. It was a lot of children killed. And you think, 'That's not fair! It doesn't happen till us. I mean, we're not doing anything till Hitler or till anybody else.' But it was suddenly brought home till us that it does happen. An' I wouldna want it till happen till any of you and I pray to God that it doesn't.<br /> <br /> Mr C: Well, Wick was bombed twice, you see, and the second bombing was on, near the aerodrome, so we became involved, our family, my family. There were two bombs dropped on two houses at the edge of the aerodrome and they were blown apart and people were killed and boys - two boys, wasn't it?<br /> <br /> Mrs C: A girl and a boy.<br /> <br /> Mr C: A girl and a boy were killed.<br /> <br /> Mrs C: John and Betty were killed.<br /> <br /> Mr C: And another bomb dropped - mind you, we didn't know about this one - another bomb dropped at the end of our street, about a hundred yards from our house and we didn't realise it was there, you see, because it didn't explode. It went into the garden; in fact, it bounced off the end of one house, went across the street and dropped in the garden and the garden had been dug and cultivated, you see, so therefore the earth was soft and the bomb went right in and just the fins sticking out o' the ground. So lo and behold, the police came along and we had to be evacuated. Everybody in the whole street had to be evacuated, so we were evacuees for a day and a night. And the bomb disposal squad from the Army - who were in Wick, of course - and they came up and they defused it. So we got back into the house - this was on the Saturday - we got back into the house on Sunday afternoon and it didn't explode. So that was one of the little episodes, you know, that we had and these little things, you never forget them, never forget them. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.