Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Rosehaugh House, near Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0458
PLACENAME
Rosehaugh
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32385
KEYWORDS
postcards
mansions
estates
trade
villages
auctions
Rosehaugh House, near Fortrose

This postcard shows Rosehaugh near Fortrose.

"Haugh" means stream and the Old Statistical Account suggests that Rosehaugh got its name from the briar roses growing by a stream. A less romantic explanation of "ros" is promontory.

The lands of Rosehaugh, originally called Pittanochtie, were bought buy Sir George Mackenzie (1636-1691) an eminent lawyer and MP who was best known for his persecution of the Covenanters, Presbyterians opposed to the Catholic Charles II.
He sold Pittanochtie in 1688 to Sir Kenneth Mackenzie, First Baronet of Scatwell. Sir Kenneth's grandson, Sir Roderick Mackenzie, built a mansion and called it Rosehaugh. In 1865 the bankrupt sixth baronet sold the estate to James Fletcher.

James Fletcher was a successful merchant trading all over the world but particularly in alpaca wool from Peru. He made many improvements on the estate and in the village of Avoch where his family's origins lay. He employed the Inverness architect Alexander Ross to extend the house and a porch and conservatory were added. James Fletcher's son, James Douglas inherited Rosehaugh in 1885 and he was responsible for the building seen here.

James hired William Flockhart who, over a ten year period, lavishly remodelled and extended the house. Work finished in 1903. James then turned his attention to the gardens. Landscaping included terraces, glasshouses and a fernery. He also did much for the community and was well-liked.

James and his wife, Lilian, had no children. When he died in 1927 she ran the estate but after the difficult years of the 1930s Lilian, by then in her seventies, sold much of the land in 1943. When she died in 1953 her niece, Mrs Shaw-Mackenzie, inherited the house and its policies. The house was suffering from neglect. Mrs Shaw-Mackenzie and her husband donated several items, including a figure of Buddha to the Royal Scottish Museum in Edinburgh where it can still be seen, before selling the estate to the Eagle Star Insurance Company.

In 1954 Eagle Star sold the contents. This was a major event for the area and the sale took place over eight days. The house needed extensive repairs especially the roof. Clay tiles instead of traditional slate had been used but had not been able to withstand the Scottish winters. Finally unable to find a buyer the house was demolished in 1959. The estate however still operates. It was sold again in 1991 and the present owners have made many improvements. Some of the properties have been refurbished and are available as holiday lets.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Rosehaugh House, near Fortrose

ROSS: Avoch

1910s

postcards; mansions; estates; trade; villages; auctions

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Rosehaugh near Fortrose.<br /> <br /> "Haugh" means stream and the Old Statistical Account suggests that Rosehaugh got its name from the briar roses growing by a stream. A less romantic explanation of "ros" is promontory.<br /> <br /> The lands of Rosehaugh, originally called Pittanochtie, were bought buy Sir George Mackenzie (1636-1691) an eminent lawyer and MP who was best known for his persecution of the Covenanters, Presbyterians opposed to the Catholic Charles II.<br /> He sold Pittanochtie in 1688 to Sir Kenneth Mackenzie, First Baronet of Scatwell. Sir Kenneth's grandson, Sir Roderick Mackenzie, built a mansion and called it Rosehaugh. In 1865 the bankrupt sixth baronet sold the estate to James Fletcher.<br /> <br /> James Fletcher was a successful merchant trading all over the world but particularly in alpaca wool from Peru. He made many improvements on the estate and in the village of Avoch where his family's origins lay. He employed the Inverness architect Alexander Ross to extend the house and a porch and conservatory were added. James Fletcher's son, James Douglas inherited Rosehaugh in 1885 and he was responsible for the building seen here. <br /> <br /> James hired William Flockhart who, over a ten year period, lavishly remodelled and extended the house. Work finished in 1903. James then turned his attention to the gardens. Landscaping included terraces, glasshouses and a fernery. He also did much for the community and was well-liked. <br /> <br /> James and his wife, Lilian, had no children. When he died in 1927 she ran the estate but after the difficult years of the 1930s Lilian, by then in her seventies, sold much of the land in 1943. When she died in 1953 her niece, Mrs Shaw-Mackenzie, inherited the house and its policies. The house was suffering from neglect. Mrs Shaw-Mackenzie and her husband donated several items, including a figure of Buddha to the Royal Scottish Museum in Edinburgh where it can still be seen, before selling the estate to the Eagle Star Insurance Company.<br /> <br /> In 1954 Eagle Star sold the contents. This was a major event for the area and the sale took place over eight days. The house needed extensive repairs especially the roof. Clay tiles instead of traditional slate had been used but had not been able to withstand the Scottish winters. Finally unable to find a buyer the house was demolished in 1959. The estate however still operates. It was sold again in 1991 and the present owners have made many improvements. Some of the properties have been refurbished and are available as holiday lets.