Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
The Gairloch to Ullapool Route

This postcard shows nine views on the route from Gairloch to Ullapool: Loch Maree from Tollie; the Destitution Road; Gruinard Bay; the Cairnmore Hills; the Gruinard River; An Teallach Peaks; Loch Ewe from Inverewe; mountain and moorland; Sal Mhor and An Teallach

The view from Tollie looking south east to Loch Maree is one of the finest in Wester Ross. Slioch, meaning spear, at 3210 feet (981 metres) dominates this beautiful loch. The many islands are covered with remnants of ancient native pinewoods. Named after St Maelrubha, who founded a church on one of the islands, the loch is steeped in myth and legend.

Destitution Road is the lonely road across the moor between Gairloch and Ullapool. During the 1840s there was great poverty in the Highlands. The potato famine of 1846 meant starvation for the people. The Central Board for the Destitute Highlands was set up and men were able to work building roads in return for food.

Gruinard Bay is an inlet of the sea on the coast of Wester Ross. It has a beautiful, sandy beach. Gruinard, from the Norse, means either green or shallow bay. It is both. In 1942 Gruinard Island was a testing site for biological weapons using anthrax, which can live in the soil for many years. It wasn't until 1990, after several attempts at decontamination, that the island was declared safe. Sheep now living on the island remain anthrax free.

The remote Cairnmore or Carnmore Hills are also known as Fisherfield Forest and often referred to as the Great Wilderness. The small flat-topped hill left of centre in the photograph is Sgurr na Locainn, or Loacainn.

The Gruinard River flows for about 4 miles from Loch na Sealg, meaning loch of the hunt, to Gruinard Bay. It is well known for salmon fishing.

An Teallach, the name comes from the Gaelic, meaning the forge, is one of the great Torridon Mountains. It is a Munro, a mountain over 3,000 feet, and has two summits. Bidein A'Ghlas Thuill, the peak of the pale grey or green hollow, is 3484 feet (1062 metres) and Sgurr Fiona, peak of wine, is 3378 feet (1060 metres).

Loch Ewe is a sea loch on the coast of Wester Ross. At the head of the Loch is the village of Poolewe and Inverewe Gardens. Here the warm influence of the Gulf Stream allows many subtropical plants to grow. Loch Ewe served as a naval base and as a vital assembly point for North Atlantic convoys during World War II.

Sal Mhor, or Sail Mhor, from the Gaelic meaning big heal, is one of the smallest Corbetts, a mountain between 2,500 and 2,999 feet. It is 2516 feet (767 metres) and is on the edge of the An Teallach group.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

The Gairloch to Ullapool Route

ROSS: Gairloch

1960s

Slioch; St Maelrubha; pinewoods; famine; destitute; anthrax; Carnmore; Fisherfield; Locainn; Sealg; Torridon; Bidein A'Ghlas Thuill; Sgurr Fiona;; Poolewe; Inverewe; naval bases; convoys; Sail Mhor

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows nine views on the route from Gairloch to Ullapool: Loch Maree from Tollie; the Destitution Road; Gruinard Bay; the Cairnmore Hills; the Gruinard River; An Teallach Peaks; Loch Ewe from Inverewe; mountain and moorland; Sal Mhor and An Teallach<br /> <br /> The view from Tollie looking south east to Loch Maree is one of the finest in Wester Ross. Slioch, meaning spear, at 3210 feet (981 metres) dominates this beautiful loch. The many islands are covered with remnants of ancient native pinewoods. Named after St Maelrubha, who founded a church on one of the islands, the loch is steeped in myth and legend. <br /> <br /> Destitution Road is the lonely road across the moor between Gairloch and Ullapool. During the 1840s there was great poverty in the Highlands. The potato famine of 1846 meant starvation for the people. The Central Board for the Destitute Highlands was set up and men were able to work building roads in return for food.<br /> <br /> Gruinard Bay is an inlet of the sea on the coast of Wester Ross. It has a beautiful, sandy beach. Gruinard, from the Norse, means either green or shallow bay. It is both. In 1942 Gruinard Island was a testing site for biological weapons using anthrax, which can live in the soil for many years. It wasn't until 1990, after several attempts at decontamination, that the island was declared safe. Sheep now living on the island remain anthrax free.<br /> <br /> The remote Cairnmore or Carnmore Hills are also known as Fisherfield Forest and often referred to as the Great Wilderness. The small flat-topped hill left of centre in the photograph is Sgurr na Locainn, or Loacainn.<br /> <br /> The Gruinard River flows for about 4 miles from Loch na Sealg, meaning loch of the hunt, to Gruinard Bay. It is well known for salmon fishing.<br /> <br /> An Teallach, the name comes from the Gaelic, meaning the forge, is one of the great Torridon Mountains. It is a Munro, a mountain over 3,000 feet, and has two summits. Bidein A'Ghlas Thuill, the peak of the pale grey or green hollow, is 3484 feet (1062 metres) and Sgurr Fiona, peak of wine, is 3378 feet (1060 metres).<br /> <br /> Loch Ewe is a sea loch on the coast of Wester Ross. At the head of the Loch is the village of Poolewe and Inverewe Gardens. Here the warm influence of the Gulf Stream allows many subtropical plants to grow. Loch Ewe served as a naval base and as a vital assembly point for North Atlantic convoys during World War II.<br /> <br /> Sal Mhor, or Sail Mhor, from the Gaelic meaning big heal, is one of the smallest Corbetts, a mountain between 2,500 and 2,999 feet. It is 2516 feet (767 metres) and is on the edge of the An Teallach group.