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Boishbhean and Ben Alligin from near Hotel, Gairloch

This postcard shows Boisbhean and Ben Alligin from near the Gairloch Hotel.

Boishbean, or Baosbheinn, on the left, and Ben, or Beinn, Alligin, on the right, belong to the Torridon Mountain range, a remote area of spectacular scenery which lies between Loch Maree and Loch Torridon. The mountains are formed of Torridonian sandstone and some contain white quartzite which can give the impression of snow. Several of the peaks rise to over 3300 feet (1000 metres).

Baosbheinn, at 2870 feet high (875 metres), is a Corbett - a mountain between 2,500 feet and 2,999 feet. The meaning is usually taken to be the wizard's peak.

Beinn Alligin is a Munro - a mountain over 3,000 feet. Its name is usually translated as the jewel and it has two peaks. Sgurr Mhor, the big peak, is 3231 (985 metres) feet and Tom na Grugaich, the hill of the damsel, is 3018 feet (920 metres).

In the foreground, it is just possible to make out the old burial ground. Behind on the left is the Parish Church and on the other side of the road the golf course.

The Parish church was originally built in 1791-3 but partly rebuilt in 1834. A porch designed by Andrew Maitland & Sons was added in 1834. The church was refurbished in 1908-9.

Opposite the church is a hollow known as Leabaidh-na-Ba-Baine - the bed of the white cow. It is a nearly perfect, natural, oval depression but tradition has it that it was created by Fingal as bed where his cow could calve. It could hold up to two thousand people and was used for Church services and by visiting preachers.

The nine-hole golf course was designed by Captain Burgess and opened in 1898.

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Boishbhean and Ben Alligin from near Hotel, Gairloch

ROSS: Gairloch

1900s

postcards; lochs; churches; burial grounds; golf; Fingal; Leabaidh-na-Ba-Baine; preachers; Captain Burgess; Torridon; Baosbheinn; Beinn Alligin; sandstone; quartzite; Andrew Maitland

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Boisbhean and Ben Alligin from near the Gairloch Hotel. <br /> <br /> Boishbean, or Baosbheinn, on the left, and Ben, or Beinn, Alligin, on the right, belong to the Torridon Mountain range, a remote area of spectacular scenery which lies between Loch Maree and Loch Torridon. The mountains are formed of Torridonian sandstone and some contain white quartzite which can give the impression of snow. Several of the peaks rise to over 3300 feet (1000 metres).<br /> <br /> Baosbheinn, at 2870 feet high (875 metres), is a Corbett - a mountain between 2,500 feet and 2,999 feet. The meaning is usually taken to be the wizard's peak.<br /> <br /> Beinn Alligin is a Munro - a mountain over 3,000 feet. Its name is usually translated as the jewel and it has two peaks. Sgurr Mhor, the big peak, is 3231 (985 metres) feet and Tom na Grugaich, the hill of the damsel, is 3018 feet (920 metres).<br /> <br /> In the foreground, it is just possible to make out the old burial ground. Behind on the left is the Parish Church and on the other side of the road the golf course.<br /> <br /> The Parish church was originally built in 1791-3 but partly rebuilt in 1834. A porch designed by Andrew Maitland & Sons was added in 1834. The church was refurbished in 1908-9.<br /> <br /> Opposite the church is a hollow known as Leabaidh-na-Ba-Baine - the bed of the white cow. It is a nearly perfect, natural, oval depression but tradition has it that it was created by Fingal as bed where his cow could calve. It could hold up to two thousand people and was used for Church services and by visiting preachers.<br /> <br /> The nine-hole golf course was designed by Captain Burgess and opened in 1898.