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TITLE
Interview with Lorna Milligan about service personnel in Golspie
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF07_TRACK06_MILLIGAN
PLACENAME
Golspie
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Lorna Milligan
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3247
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
soldiers
airmen
air force
audio

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Lorna Milligan recalls that people of many nationalities came to the village of Golspie during World War 2.

Well, in Golspie there was a lot of the Indian army was being trained in the countryside round about and they were billeted in our school, in the old part of our school. And the cookhouse was there and the Indians were always making great big pots of curry and it was really smelly curry. And they were making chapatis on the, on the stoves and they would say to us, 'You like chapati? You like chapati?' And that's, I remember that, you know. They would give us chapatis. Very kind people. They were Sikhs and they had the turbans, you know, and they tied their turbans onto the railings of the school - this miles of turbans drying afterwards - but they were lovely, they were lovely. I mean, I was only what, I would have been about your age, about twelve. But it's very clear in my mind, very clear. It was nice. There was, they had mules and sheep and all these things, you know, but that was the cookhouse. And then they had the army itself was, they were training up in the hills, training their army officers, you know, the army. It was good.

It was quite, it was a funny feeling. Golspie was such a quiet little village and suddenly all these different people were arriving. There was Honduras for cutting down trees, there was Newfoundlanders cutting down trees, and there was an RAF station just outside Golspie, and there was the Indians and there was all these different people all arriving in this little quiet village, which made a vast difference to our, to our lives during the war, you know. But it was all happy. Everybody - There was no problems. No nastiness or fighting or nothing like that. You wouldn't think there was a war. It was different but you wouldn't actually think it was like a war, you know, as such. No, it was happy memories.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.

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Interview with Lorna Milligan about service personnel in Golspie

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; soldiers; airmen; air force; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Lorna Milligan recalls that people of many nationalities came to the village of Golspie during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Well, in Golspie there was a lot of the Indian army was being trained in the countryside round about and they were billeted in our school, in the old part of our school. And the cookhouse was there and the Indians were always making great big pots of curry and it was really smelly curry. And they were making chapatis on the, on the stoves and they would say to us, 'You like chapati? You like chapati?' And that's, I remember that, you know. They would give us chapatis. Very kind people. They were Sikhs and they had the turbans, you know, and they tied their turbans onto the railings of the school - this miles of turbans drying afterwards - but they were lovely, they were lovely. I mean, I was only what, I would have been about your age, about twelve. But it's very clear in my mind, very clear. It was nice. There was, they had mules and sheep and all these things, you know, but that was the cookhouse. And then they had the army itself was, they were training up in the hills, training their army officers, you know, the army. It was good.<br /> <br /> It was quite, it was a funny feeling. Golspie was such a quiet little village and suddenly all these different people were arriving. There was Honduras for cutting down trees, there was Newfoundlanders cutting down trees, and there was an RAF station just outside Golspie, and there was the Indians and there was all these different people all arriving in this little quiet village, which made a vast difference to our, to our lives during the war, you know. But it was all happy. Everybody - There was no problems. No nastiness or fighting or nothing like that. You wouldn't think there was a war. It was different but you wouldn't actually think it was like a war, you know, as such. No, it was happy memories. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.