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TITLE
Achnaclearach Falls, Garve
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0574
PLACENAME
Achnaclerach Falls
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Contin
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32496
KEYWORDS
postcards
waterfalls
rivers
Killin
Fionn
Viach
Glascarnoch
Conon
Rasay
Achnaclearach Falls, Garve

This postcard shows Achnaclearach, or Achnaclerach, Falls.

Achnaclerach Falls are situated on the Black Water River, above Loch Garve in Ross and Cromarty. This stretch of the river is known as the River Garve.

Achnaclerach means the cleric's field and is probably connected to Killin at the west end of Loch Garve. The Gaelic for Killin is Cill-Fhinn, Fionn's chapel, named after St Fionn.

The source of the Black Water is in the mountains at the head of Strathvaich. The river was dammed in the 1950s to create Loch Vaich, part of the Conon Valley hydro-electric scheme. Out of this loch flows Abhainn Srath a 'Bhathaich. From its confluence with the Glascarnoch River it is known as the Black Water.

The Black Water, which is well kown for trout and salmon fishing, continues to Loch Garve and then on to join the Conon. In the Old Statistical Account (1791-99) it is referred to as the River Rasay.

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Achnaclearach Falls, Garve

ROSS: Contin

1930s

postcards; waterfalls; rivers; Killin; Fionn; Viach; Glascarnoch; Conon; Rasay

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Achnaclearach, or Achnaclerach, Falls.<br /> <br /> Achnaclerach Falls are situated on the Black Water River, above Loch Garve in Ross and Cromarty. This stretch of the river is known as the River Garve. <br /> <br /> Achnaclerach means the cleric's field and is probably connected to Killin at the west end of Loch Garve. The Gaelic for Killin is Cill-Fhinn, Fionn's chapel, named after St Fionn.<br /> <br /> The source of the Black Water is in the mountains at the head of Strathvaich. The river was dammed in the 1950s to create Loch Vaich, part of the Conon Valley hydro-electric scheme. Out of this loch flows Abhainn Srath a 'Bhathaich. From its confluence with the Glascarnoch River it is known as the Black Water. <br /> <br /> The Black Water, which is well kown for trout and salmon fishing, continues to Loch Garve and then on to join the Conon. In the Old Statistical Account (1791-99) it is referred to as the River Rasay.