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TITLE
General view, Garve
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0578
PLACENAME
Garve
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Contin
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32500
KEYWORDS
postcards
hotels
inns
Skye Railway
canals
Stromeferry
fishing boats
railways
General view, Garve

This postcard shows a general view of Garve.

Garve is a small settlement in Ross and Cromarty. The name comes from the Gaelic "gairbh" meaning rough place. It has a hotel, a station and a school.

Garve Hotel is a well known fishing hotel which is situated on the site of one of the oldest inns in Scotland, once a favourite stopping place for drovers taking their cattle from the west to markets in the south.

Garve is one of the stops on the Skye Railway which opened in 1870. The station was designed by Murdoch Paterson and has a fine lattice-sided foot bridge across the line. A feature of the station is that there is a particularly wide gap between the up and down lines. The original plan for the Skye Railway was not just to carry passengers, goods and fish between east and west but to transport fishing boats as well. This was to avoid the dangers of the journey round the north of Scotland. There was the safer alternative of the route through the Caledonian Canal but this was expensive. The idea was that vessels would be craned out of the water at the Dingwall Canal on to special wagons and transported across the country to be lowered in to the sea at Strome Ferry. The extra wide gap at Garve was to allow the boat trains to pass other passenger and goods trains safely. The cranes were ordered and it was hoped that the railway would be ready for the early summer when the fishing fleet needed to be moved. However when it became clear that the railway would not open until July the cranes were postponed until the following year. That was the last that was heard of the "Fishers' Boats" scheme, the only legacy the gap at Garve Station.

Garve had the possibility of becoming a major junction. Twice in the late nineteenth century plans were proposed to build a railway line from Garve to Ullapool. In 1890
the route was given Royal Assent but disagreements between the rival railway companies meant that it never came to fruition.

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General view, Garve

ROSS: Contin

1920s

postcards; hotels; inns; Skye Railway; canals; Stromeferry; fishing boats; railways

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a general view of Garve.<br /> <br /> Garve is a small settlement in Ross and Cromarty. The name comes from the Gaelic "gairbh" meaning rough place. It has a hotel, a station and a school. <br /> <br /> Garve Hotel is a well known fishing hotel which is situated on the site of one of the oldest inns in Scotland, once a favourite stopping place for drovers taking their cattle from the west to markets in the south.<br /> <br /> Garve is one of the stops on the Skye Railway which opened in 1870. The station was designed by Murdoch Paterson and has a fine lattice-sided foot bridge across the line. A feature of the station is that there is a particularly wide gap between the up and down lines. The original plan for the Skye Railway was not just to carry passengers, goods and fish between east and west but to transport fishing boats as well. This was to avoid the dangers of the journey round the north of Scotland. There was the safer alternative of the route through the Caledonian Canal but this was expensive. The idea was that vessels would be craned out of the water at the Dingwall Canal on to special wagons and transported across the country to be lowered in to the sea at Strome Ferry. The extra wide gap at Garve was to allow the boat trains to pass other passenger and goods trains safely. The cranes were ordered and it was hoped that the railway would be ready for the early summer when the fishing fleet needed to be moved. However when it became clear that the railway would not open until July the cranes were postponed until the following year. That was the last that was heard of the "Fishers' Boats" scheme, the only legacy the gap at Garve Station. <br /> <br /> Garve had the possibility of becoming a major junction. Twice in the late nineteenth century plans were proposed to build a railway line from Garve to Ullapool. In 1890<br /> the route was given Royal Assent but disagreements between the rival railway companies meant that it never came to fruition.