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TITLE
Loch Garve from above Golf Course, Strathpeffer Spa
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0590
PLACENAME
Loch Garve
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Contin
PERIOD
1930s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32511
KEYWORDS
postcards
Fionn
Killin
pegmatites
garnets
kelpies
waterhorses
Loch Garve from above Golf Course, Strathpeffer Spa

This postcard shows Loch Garve from above the golf course at Strathpeffer Spa.

Loch Garve is in the distance. The small lochs in the foreground are An-Dubh Lochan, little black loch, and Loch na Crann, loch of the beam or mast.

The Gaelic name for Loch Garve is Loch Maol-Fhinn, the loch of the followers of St Fionn. The Roy Map of 1747 names it Loch Killen and in the New Statistical Account (1834-45) it is referred to as Loch Killin. Killin, in Gaelic Cill-Fhinn, Fionn's chapel, is at the west end of the loch. Garve is from the Gaelic "gairbh" meaning rough place. Pegmatite rocks (coarse grained, igneous rock from ancient slow cooling lava) containing garnets have been found around Loch Garve.

There is a story of a kelpie, or waterhorse, living in Loch Garve. A kelpie may appear as a man or a horse. The kelpie in Loch Garve had, as kelpies do, carried off a girl to be his wife and although he provided her with a fine house under the water and plenty fresh food she was unhappy because she was so cold. The kelpie was kind and he loved his wife. In the guise of a horse he went to the village of Garve in search of a mason. He allowed the mason to catch and mount him but then carried him back to the loch. He persuaded the mason to build a fireplace and a chimney for the house under the water before returning him unharmed to the village. The kelpie's wife then had warmth and cooked food and was happy. As a reward the mason just had to stand beside the loch and say "fish" and the next day he would find a basket of fresh fish left for him. It is said that there is a spot on the loch which never freezes over because of the heat rising from the kelpie's chimney.

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Loch Garve from above Golf Course, Strathpeffer Spa

ROSS: Contin

1930s

postcards; Fionn; Killin; pegmatites; garnets; kelpies; waterhorses

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Loch Garve from above the golf course at Strathpeffer Spa.<br /> <br /> Loch Garve is in the distance. The small lochs in the foreground are An-Dubh Lochan, little black loch, and Loch na Crann, loch of the beam or mast.<br /> <br /> The Gaelic name for Loch Garve is Loch Maol-Fhinn, the loch of the followers of St Fionn. The Roy Map of 1747 names it Loch Killen and in the New Statistical Account (1834-45) it is referred to as Loch Killin. Killin, in Gaelic Cill-Fhinn, Fionn's chapel, is at the west end of the loch. Garve is from the Gaelic "gairbh" meaning rough place. Pegmatite rocks (coarse grained, igneous rock from ancient slow cooling lava) containing garnets have been found around Loch Garve.<br /> <br /> There is a story of a kelpie, or waterhorse, living in Loch Garve. A kelpie may appear as a man or a horse. The kelpie in Loch Garve had, as kelpies do, carried off a girl to be his wife and although he provided her with a fine house under the water and plenty fresh food she was unhappy because she was so cold. The kelpie was kind and he loved his wife. In the guise of a horse he went to the village of Garve in search of a mason. He allowed the mason to catch and mount him but then carried him back to the loch. He persuaded the mason to build a fireplace and a chimney for the house under the water before returning him unharmed to the village. The kelpie's wife then had warmth and cooked food and was happy. As a reward the mason just had to stand beside the loch and say "fish" and the next day he would find a basket of fresh fish left for him. It is said that there is a spot on the loch which never freezes over because of the heat rising from the kelpie's chimney.