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TITLE
Tornapress, Applecross
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0625
PLACENAME
Tornapress
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochcarron
PERIOD
1930s; 1940s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32545
KEYWORDS
tornapress
devil's elbow
Applecross
bealach na bà
bealach road
Tornapress, Applecross

Tornapress is a tiny township near Kishorn where a narrow road branches off the A896 from Lochcarron to Shieldaig, and crosses the hills to Applecross.

This bleak and exposed road, which rises from sea level at Applecross to over 2,000ft at the summit six miles inland, features a particularly steep and winding section known as Bealach na Bà - the pass of the cattle - and is regularly closed during the winter.

A mile south of the summit is the Devil's Elbow, a notorious double-hairpin bend climbing at a gradient of 1-in-3. The modern road bypasses the hairpin bends, but the old road still exists and its route can be walked, or carefully cycled. The average gradient of the whole climb is 1-in-7 (14%).

The name Applecross is at least 1300 years old and is used locally to refer to the 19th century village with the pub and post office, lying on the small Applecross Bay, facing the Inner Sound, on the opposite side of which lies the Inner Hebridean island of Raasay.

The small River Applecross flows into the bay at Applecross. Applecross is also the name of the local estate.

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Tornapress, Applecross

ROSS: Lochcarron

1930s; 1940s

tornapress; devil's elbow; Applecross; bealach na bà; bealach road

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

Tornapress is a tiny township near Kishorn where a narrow road branches off the A896 from Lochcarron to Shieldaig, and crosses the hills to Applecross. <br /> <br /> This bleak and exposed road, which rises from sea level at Applecross to over 2,000ft at the summit six miles inland, features a particularly steep and winding section known as Bealach na Bà - the pass of the cattle - and is regularly closed during the winter. <br /> <br /> A mile south of the summit is the Devil's Elbow, a notorious double-hairpin bend climbing at a gradient of 1-in-3. The modern road bypasses the hairpin bends, but the old road still exists and its route can be walked, or carefully cycled. The average gradient of the whole climb is 1-in-7 (14%).<br /> <br /> The name Applecross is at least 1300 years old and is used locally to refer to the 19th century village with the pub and post office, lying on the small Applecross Bay, facing the Inner Sound, on the opposite side of which lies the Inner Hebridean island of Raasay. <br /> <br /> The small River Applecross flows into the bay at Applecross. Applecross is also the name of the local estate.