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TITLE
Interview with Rod Geddes about the black-out
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF08_TRACK04_GEDDES
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Rod Geddes
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3256
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
audio

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Rod Geddes remembers the black-out in the Inverness area during World War 2.

Oh yes, lots of memories of the black-outs. Em, the streets were all black. They were all, everything, during the winter-time it was terrible actually because you was afraid to go out at night because of the black-outs because you couldn't see. And one of the memories is with cars - the odd car, I may add - they had big things now like, so it was just very little light that was coming out of them and they were crawling round the streets. And, as was already mentioned, the wardens would come round if you were showing a light in any way at all. I remember there was no electric lights in the town; it was all gas. I remember they got a gas lighter but it was after the war that he came out to light the lamps.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Aldourie Primary School.

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Interview with Rod Geddes about the black-out

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Rod Geddes remembers the black-out in the Inverness area during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Oh yes, lots of memories of the black-outs. Em, the streets were all black. They were all, everything, during the winter-time it was terrible actually because you was afraid to go out at night because of the black-outs because you couldn't see. And one of the memories is with cars - the odd car, I may add - they had big things now like, so it was just very little light that was coming out of them and they were crawling round the streets. And, as was already mentioned, the wardens would come round if you were showing a light in any way at all. I remember there was no electric lights in the town; it was all gas. I remember they got a gas lighter but it was after the war that he came out to light the lamps. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Aldourie Primary School.