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TITLE
Interview with Mrs I M Macarthur about the black-out
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF08_TRACK07_MACARTHUR
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Mrs I M Macarthur
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3259
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
Air Raid Precaution
black-outs
audio

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Mrs I M Macarthur mentions good and bad points of the black-out imposed in World War 2.

The worst was the black-out. And everything was blacked out. I mean, if you had even that much o' a light showing at a window, the ARP warden was on your top. 'Get that blind right up!' So, but everything was pitch black. There was no street lighting. The cars had half their lights blacked off. You had a wee peep o' light at the bottom and that was all. You daren't show any lights in case they attracted the planes, you see.

I remember, we lived in a wee house at Kilravock at that time and the walls were about that thick. And in the bedroom there was a little window and the black-out blind was on the inside of the wall. And my sister and I used to sit in there and watch the planes taking off from Dalcross Aerodrome, as it was then - Inverness Aerodrome now. We used to watch them taking off, the searchlights following them, you know. Because everything was pitch black. Even the Northern Lights were beautiful in those days because there was no lights to detract from them.

But I remember going out and in to Inverness in the bus in the black-out. No lights in the bus; they were blacked out. And you got to know when your let-off point was coming, you know. The Croy ones got off and then I knew that I was the next at the end of Kilravock road-end. You just stood up and the bus driver let you off.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Mrs I M Macarthur about the black-out

INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; Air Raid Precaution; black-outs; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Mrs I M Macarthur mentions good and bad points of the black-out imposed in World War 2.<br /> <br /> The worst was the black-out. And everything was blacked out. I mean, if you had even that much o' a light showing at a window, the ARP warden was on your top. 'Get that blind right up!' So, but everything was pitch black. There was no street lighting. The cars had half their lights blacked off. You had a wee peep o' light at the bottom and that was all. You daren't show any lights in case they attracted the planes, you see. <br /> <br /> I remember, we lived in a wee house at Kilravock at that time and the walls were about that thick. And in the bedroom there was a little window and the black-out blind was on the inside of the wall. And my sister and I used to sit in there and watch the planes taking off from Dalcross Aerodrome, as it was then - Inverness Aerodrome now. We used to watch them taking off, the searchlights following them, you know. Because everything was pitch black. Even the Northern Lights were beautiful in those days because there was no lights to detract from them. <br /> <br /> But I remember going out and in to Inverness in the bus in the black-out. No lights in the bus; they were blacked out. And you got to know when your let-off point was coming, you know. The Croy ones got off and then I knew that I was the next at the end of Kilravock road-end. You just stood up and the bus driver let you off. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.