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TITLE
Interview with Duncan and Elsie Cormack about Anderson shelters
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF08_TRACK11_CORMACK
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Duncan & Elsie Cormack
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3266
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
air raid shelter
air raid shelters
audio

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Duncan and Elsie Cormack talk about Anderson shelters in Wick during World War 2.

Mr C: We had a shelter. We lived in a police house - as I said to you, my dad was a policeman, right, we lived in a police house, so we had a garden. So they dug in all the gardens and they put in this Anderson shelter after one of the government men of the time, Mr Anderson, and he got the, he thought about this shelters and they got his name, so they were called an Anderson shelter. And they dug a hole and they made a foundation and, and then setted it in and then covered it with earth and camouflaged it, you see, and we, when the siren went, eventually after about 1942, that would be - later on - we would troop out and into the shelter, maybe at two o'clock in the morning, in wur jamas -

Mrs C: But it was much worse for them that -

Mr C: - and an old coat on us. And we sat in a row. There was my three brothers and -

Mrs C: Two sisters

Mr C: - two sisters. And we would sit there like this, you know, two o'clock in the morning in a cold shelter, three feet -

Mrs C: 'I wanna go to ma bed!'

Mr C: - under the ground. 'I'm needing the toilet!' [Laughter]

Mrs C: We hadn't got en suite then. [Laughter]

Mr C: No, but it was funny. We finished up in the morning and went to school in the morning and everybody said, 'Were you in your shelter last night?' and we compared notes, you see, and experiences and it was good fun. That's what kept us going. You had to keep the morale up.

Mrs C: That's because there's nothing serious happened but, I mean, where people that went in till, were in the cities and really were getting it bad -

Mr C: Oh aye.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.

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Interview with Duncan and Elsie Cormack about Anderson shelters

CAITHNESS: Wick

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; air raid shelter; air raid shelters; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Duncan and Elsie Cormack talk about Anderson shelters in Wick during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Mr C: We had a shelter. We lived in a police house - as I said to you, my dad was a policeman, right, we lived in a police house, so we had a garden. So they dug in all the gardens and they put in this Anderson shelter after one of the government men of the time, Mr Anderson, and he got the, he thought about this shelters and they got his name, so they were called an Anderson shelter. And they dug a hole and they made a foundation and, and then setted it in and then covered it with earth and camouflaged it, you see, and we, when the siren went, eventually after about 1942, that would be - later on - we would troop out and into the shelter, maybe at two o'clock in the morning, in wur jamas -<br /> <br /> Mrs C: But it was much worse for them that -<br /> <br /> Mr C: - and an old coat on us. And we sat in a row. There was my three brothers and -<br /> <br /> Mrs C: Two sisters<br /> <br /> Mr C: - two sisters. And we would sit there like this, you know, two o'clock in the morning in a cold shelter, three feet -<br /> <br /> Mrs C: 'I wanna go to ma bed!'<br /> <br /> Mr C: - under the ground. 'I'm needing the toilet!' [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Mrs C: We hadn't got en suite then. [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Mr C: No, but it was funny. We finished up in the morning and went to school in the morning and everybody said, 'Were you in your shelter last night?' and we compared notes, you see, and experiences and it was good fun. That's what kept us going. You had to keep the morale up.<br /> <br /> Mrs C: That's because there's nothing serious happened but, I mean, where people that went in till, were in the cities and really were getting it bad -<br /> <br /> Mr C: Oh aye. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.