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TITLE
The Waning Day, Kyle of Lochalsh
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0741
PLACENAME
Kyle of Lochalsh
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32661
KEYWORDS
harbours piers
railway piers
fishing
Fernbank Works
fish curing
The Waning Day, Kyle of Lochalsh

The hills of Skye lie gloomily in the background of this early postcard showing the railway pier at Kyle of Lochalsh. A number of fishing boats are tied up and all seems quiet along the shore in front of the fish processing sheds to the right.

The terminus on the pier was opened at Kyle in 1897. This was of great benefit to local fishermen who could unload their catch straight onto the station platform ready for transportation to market by rail. In just a few years, the arrival of the railway transformed the remote village into a bustling place with steamers docking at the pier carrying mail, freight and passengers, many of them tourists bound for the Isle of Skye.

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The Waning Day, Kyle of Lochalsh

ROSS: Lochalsh

1910s

harbours piers; railway piers; fishing; Fernbank Works; fish curing

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The hills of Skye lie gloomily in the background of this early postcard showing the railway pier at Kyle of Lochalsh. A number of fishing boats are tied up and all seems quiet along the shore in front of the fish processing sheds to the right. <br /> <br /> The terminus on the pier was opened at Kyle in 1897. This was of great benefit to local fishermen who could unload their catch straight onto the station platform ready for transportation to market by rail. In just a few years, the arrival of the railway transformed the remote village into a bustling place with steamers docking at the pier carrying mail, freight and passengers, many of them tourists bound for the Isle of Skye.