Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Highland Clachan at Loch Duich
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0755
PLACENAME
Loch Duich
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Glenshiel
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32674
KEYWORDS
postcards
clachans
hamlets
villages
lochs
thatching
Highland Clachan at Loch Duich

This postcard shows a painting of a Highland clachan in the early twentieth century, situated at Loch Duich in Wester Ross. The Gaelic word 'clachan' translates in English to 'a township' or 'a small village'.

To the right is an example of a typical thatched house. A thatched roof was based on a wooden frame resting on the cottage walls. Thatch was cheap and was also light, so it did not put unnecessary weight stress on the walls. An overlapping layer of heathery turf was placed over the frame and covered by a layer of thatch. The thatch was secured with old fishing net or twine tied to large rocks to anchor it. In most places the roof was re-thatched each year. The old thatch was generally used as fertiliser

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Highland Clachan at Loch Duich

ROSS: Glenshiel

1900s

postcards; clachans; hamlets; villages; lochs; thatching

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries - Illustrated postcards

This postcard shows a painting of a Highland clachan in the early twentieth century, situated at Loch Duich in Wester Ross. The Gaelic word 'clachan' translates in English to 'a township' or 'a small village'.<br /> <br /> To the right is an example of a typical thatched house. A thatched roof was based on a wooden frame resting on the cottage walls. Thatch was cheap and was also light, so it did not put unnecessary weight stress on the walls. An overlapping layer of heathery turf was placed over the frame and covered by a layer of thatch. The thatch was secured with old fishing net or twine tied to large rocks to anchor it. In most places the roof was re-thatched each year. The old thatch was generally used as fertiliser