Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Interview with Margaret Bochel about war-time treats
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF09_TRACK01_BOCHEL
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Margaret Bochel
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3268
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Margaret Bochel had a cousin who brought gifts from America during World War 2.

Yes, now I remember, talking about that, that I had a cousin who came from New Zealand. He and his family had left Nairn before the war and he was in the Merchant Navy and he used to travel all over. He was shipwrecked once and came up to Nairn for a holiday after that because that was a very serious thing to happen to him.

But once or twice, when he had been to America, he brought back presents for us and that was exciting. I remember going to the door and finding parcels for everybody. One of the things I got when I was a little bit older were nylon stockings. No, not nylon; silk stockings, which we couldn't of course buy at all in Nairn, or anywhere probably in this country at the time. So he had brought those home. Unfortunately, they didn't last very long, because we used to carry baskets about with us in those days instead of bags, and as you know, baskets are made of willow canes and things and they had sharp edges that tore the silk stockings, so that was the end of them. Of course, they couldn't be repaired.

And another time he brought me a powder compact. It was the first one I had - I'd be about sixteen or seventeen at the time, so I was really thrilled about that. And it was nice to have him too in Nairn because I was just a baby when they went away to New Zealand and I didn't remember any of them. But he was a great laugh, this New Zealand cousin; he was always making us laugh. So that was exciting; yes, it was.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Rosebank Primary School, Nairn.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Interview with Margaret Bochel about war-time treats

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Margaret Bochel had a cousin who brought gifts from America during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Yes, now I remember, talking about that, that I had a cousin who came from New Zealand. He and his family had left Nairn before the war and he was in the Merchant Navy and he used to travel all over. He was shipwrecked once and came up to Nairn for a holiday after that because that was a very serious thing to happen to him. <br /> <br /> But once or twice, when he had been to America, he brought back presents for us and that was exciting. I remember going to the door and finding parcels for everybody. One of the things I got when I was a little bit older were nylon stockings. No, not nylon; silk stockings, which we couldn't of course buy at all in Nairn, or anywhere probably in this country at the time. So he had brought those home. Unfortunately, they didn't last very long, because we used to carry baskets about with us in those days instead of bags, and as you know, baskets are made of willow canes and things and they had sharp edges that tore the silk stockings, so that was the end of them. Of course, they couldn't be repaired. <br /> <br /> And another time he brought me a powder compact. It was the first one I had - I'd be about sixteen or seventeen at the time, so I was really thrilled about that. And it was nice to have him too in Nairn because I was just a baby when they went away to New Zealand and I didn't remember any of them. But he was a great laugh, this New Zealand cousin; he was always making us laugh. So that was exciting; yes, it was.<br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Rosebank Primary School, Nairn.