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TITLE
Loch Duich and Eilean Donan Castle
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0777
PLACENAME
Dornie
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32696
KEYWORDS
postcards
lochs
Jacobites
castles
Lochalsh
Loch Duich and Eilean Donan Castle

This postcard shows Loch Duich in Ross-shire and the ruins of Eilean Donan Castle. Loch Duich is a sea loch that travels south east from the village of Dornie and leads into the Kyle of Loch Alsh, before flowing into the open sea.

Eilean Donan Castle sits at the mouth of Loch Duich. The small island may have been inhabited from as far back as the 3rd century, but the original castle was built in the 13th century. It was held by the Mackenzies of Kintail for some 400 years, but was destroyed by government naval forces in 1719 when occupied by Spanish and Jacobite troops. The present castle was reconstructed from the ruins by Lt. Colonel MacRae-Gilstrap and completed in 1932, becoming surely one of the most photographed castles in Scotland

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Loch Duich and Eilean Donan Castle

ROSS: Lochalsh

1900s

postcards; lochs; Jacobites; castles; Lochalsh

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Loch Duich in Ross-shire and the ruins of Eilean Donan Castle. Loch Duich is a sea loch that travels south east from the village of Dornie and leads into the Kyle of Loch Alsh, before flowing into the open sea. <br /> <br /> Eilean Donan Castle sits at the mouth of Loch Duich. The small island may have been inhabited from as far back as the 3rd century, but the original castle was built in the 13th century. It was held by the Mackenzies of Kintail for some 400 years, but was destroyed by government naval forces in 1719 when occupied by Spanish and Jacobite troops. The present castle was reconstructed from the ruins by Lt. Colonel MacRae-Gilstrap and completed in 1932, becoming surely one of the most photographed castles in Scotland