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TITLE
Fairy Glen House, Rosemarkie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0877
PLACENAME
Rosemarkie
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
PERIOD
1910s; 1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32794
KEYWORDS
postcards
Fairy Glen
houses
crofts
folklore
local traditions
linen industry
flax
The Pows
salmon
fishing industry
Fairy Glen House, Rosemarkie

This postcard shows Fairy Glen House at Rosemarkie. The house is presumably named after the woodland surrounding it, known as the Fairy Glen. Many stories exist locally concerning how the glen was named but one tradition relates how every Sunday local children would congregate at the sight of a spring. The pool surrounding the spring would be cleared of debris and flower petals spread upon it by the children as a gift to the fairies. It was hoped that in return the fairies would ensure that fresh water was provided for the village.

By the late 1700s the village of Rosemarkie had a population of around three hundred, twenty of whom were linen weavers. Flax was grown locally and steeped in ponds known as 'The Pows' in front of Fairy Glen House. The flax was then woven and bleached. The linen industry declined rapidly during the 1800s due to the administering of heavy taxes on the linen merchants. However, an alternative use for 'The Pows' was found shortly afterwards when the village became an important base for salmon fishing. During the winter ice was collected from the ponds and transported to nearby ice houses in order to preserve the fish.

Today, the Fairy Glen is managed by local landowners and the RSPB

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Fairy Glen House, Rosemarkie

ROSS: Rosemarkie

1910s; 1920s

postcards; Fairy Glen; houses; crofts; folklore; local traditions; linen industry; flax; The Pows; salmon; fishing industry

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Fairy Glen House at Rosemarkie. The house is presumably named after the woodland surrounding it, known as the Fairy Glen. Many stories exist locally concerning how the glen was named but one tradition relates how every Sunday local children would congregate at the sight of a spring. The pool surrounding the spring would be cleared of debris and flower petals spread upon it by the children as a gift to the fairies. It was hoped that in return the fairies would ensure that fresh water was provided for the village.<br /> <br /> By the late 1700s the village of Rosemarkie had a population of around three hundred, twenty of whom were linen weavers. Flax was grown locally and steeped in ponds known as 'The Pows' in front of Fairy Glen House. The flax was then woven and bleached. The linen industry declined rapidly during the 1800s due to the administering of heavy taxes on the linen merchants. However, an alternative use for 'The Pows' was found shortly afterwards when the village became an important base for salmon fishing. During the winter ice was collected from the ponds and transported to nearby ice houses in order to preserve the fish.<br /> <br /> Today, the Fairy Glen is managed by local landowners and the RSPB