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TITLE
Waterfalls at Fairy Glen, Rosemarkie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0879
PLACENAME
Rosemarkie
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32797
KEYWORDS
postcards
waterfalls
falls
Fairy Glen
folklore
RSPB
Rosemarkie Burn
fairies
Waterfalls at Fairy Glen, Rosemarkie

This postcard shows the waterfalls at the Fairy Glen in Rosemarkie. The two falls form part of a wooded walk through the glen, following the Markie Burn. Today, the Fairy Glen is partially managed by the RSPB and during the tourist season local rangers hold early morning walks for those interested in hearing the dawn chorus. A pathway allows tourists to walk underneath the falls, giving spectacular views.

Many stories exist locally concerning how the glen got its name but one tradition relates how every Sunday local children would congregate at the sight of a spring. The pool surrounding the spring would be cleared of debris and flower petals spread upon it by the children as a gift to the fairies. It was hoped that in return the fairies would ensure that fresh water was provided for the village

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Waterfalls at Fairy Glen, Rosemarkie

ROSS: Rosemarkie

1920s; 1930s

postcards; waterfalls; falls; Fairy Glen; folklore; RSPB; Rosemarkie Burn; fairies

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the waterfalls at the Fairy Glen in Rosemarkie. The two falls form part of a wooded walk through the glen, following the Markie Burn. Today, the Fairy Glen is partially managed by the RSPB and during the tourist season local rangers hold early morning walks for those interested in hearing the dawn chorus. A pathway allows tourists to walk underneath the falls, giving spectacular views.<br /> <br /> Many stories exist locally concerning how the glen got its name but one tradition relates how every Sunday local children would congregate at the sight of a spring. The pool surrounding the spring would be cleared of debris and flower petals spread upon it by the children as a gift to the fairies. It was hoped that in return the fairies would ensure that fresh water was provided for the village