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TITLE
Shieldaig Island, Wester Ross
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0905
PLACENAME
Shieldaig
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Applecross
PERIOD
1940s; 1950s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32827
KEYWORDS
postcards
islands
lochs
villages
bird sanctuary
bird sanctuaries
Shieldaig Island, Wester Ross

This postcard shows Shieldaig Island, situated on Loch Shieldaig in Wester Ross. In the foreground is the village of Shieldaig. It is thought that Shieldaig Island was planted with Scots pine seeds during the 1800s to provide Shieldaig village with poles for fishing nets and ships.

The village of Shieldaig was laid out in the early 1800s to encourage families to make a living from fishing. Another principal reason for the development of the village was to raise and train seamen to serve in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. The Admiralty offered grants to the people of Shieldaig to build housing and boats and £2700 was spent on building Shieldaig's three main streets.

Shieldaig Island is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland as a site of special scientific interest. It is home to many types of bird including kestrels, herons and owls

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Shieldaig Island, Wester Ross

ROSS: Applecross

1940s; 1950s

postcards; islands; lochs; villages; bird sanctuary; bird sanctuaries

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Shieldaig Island, situated on Loch Shieldaig in Wester Ross. In the foreground is the village of Shieldaig. It is thought that Shieldaig Island was planted with Scots pine seeds during the 1800s to provide Shieldaig village with poles for fishing nets and ships.<br /> <br /> The village of Shieldaig was laid out in the early 1800s to encourage families to make a living from fishing. Another principal reason for the development of the village was to raise and train seamen to serve in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. The Admiralty offered grants to the people of Shieldaig to build housing and boats and £2700 was spent on building Shieldaig's three main streets. <br /> <br /> Shieldaig Island is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland as a site of special scientific interest. It is home to many types of bird including kestrels, herons and owls