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TITLE
St. Maelrhuba's Well, Isle Maree
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0935
PLACENAME
Isle Maree
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32856
KEYWORDS
postcards
Queen Victoria
wells
healing
insanity
St. Maelrhuba
springs
saints
Loch Maree
Isle Maree
rituals
rites
trees
The Money Tree
oaks
folklore
The Sacred Well
St. Maelrhuba's Well, Isle Maree

This postcard shows St. Maelrhuba's Well, otherwise known as 'The Sacred Well', on Isle Maree in Wester Ross. Beside the well stands an oak tree known as 'The Money Tree'.

The well has been considered sacred since pre-Christian days but over time it has become connected to St. Maelrhuba. The Irish saint founded a monastery at nearby Applecross and later made his home on Isle Maree, one of over thirty islands in Loch Maree.

St. Maelrhuba's Well was believed to have contained healing properties, particularly for the curing of insanity. Part of the ritual performed in order to receive healing involved the patient drinking water from the well while an offering was made, by attaching a rag to the nearby 'Money Tree'. An alternative to this was to drive the edge of a coin into the bark of the tree. Local folklore states that coins that fall out of 'The Money Tree' are a sign of wishes that will not be granted.

Journeys to the well continued until as late as the 1850s. The well became so famous that in 1877, Queen Victoria visited it and also left a coin behind at 'The Money Tree'. The soil surrounding the tree is said to be shallow because of the vast number of coins found at the front of the trunk. The oldest coin in the tree has been recorded as dating from 1828

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St. Maelrhuba's Well, Isle Maree

ROSS: Gairloch

1920s; 1930s

postcards; Queen Victoria; wells; healing; insanity; St. Maelrhuba; springs; saints; Loch Maree; Isle Maree; rituals; rites; trees; The Money Tree; oaks; folklore; The Sacred Well

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows St. Maelrhuba's Well, otherwise known as 'The Sacred Well', on Isle Maree in Wester Ross. Beside the well stands an oak tree known as 'The Money Tree'. <br /> <br /> The well has been considered sacred since pre-Christian days but over time it has become connected to St. Maelrhuba. The Irish saint founded a monastery at nearby Applecross and later made his home on Isle Maree, one of over thirty islands in Loch Maree. <br /> <br /> St. Maelrhuba's Well was believed to have contained healing properties, particularly for the curing of insanity. Part of the ritual performed in order to receive healing involved the patient drinking water from the well while an offering was made, by attaching a rag to the nearby 'Money Tree'. An alternative to this was to drive the edge of a coin into the bark of the tree. Local folklore states that coins that fall out of 'The Money Tree' are a sign of wishes that will not be granted. <br /> <br /> Journeys to the well continued until as late as the 1850s. The well became so famous that in 1877, Queen Victoria visited it and also left a coin behind at 'The Money Tree'. The soil surrounding the tree is said to be shallow because of the vast number of coins found at the front of the trunk. The oldest coin in the tree has been recorded as dating from 1828