Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
East end of High Street, Invergordon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1035
PLACENAME
Invergordon
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosskeen
PERIOD
1910s; 1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32956
KEYWORDS
postcards
hotels
Carlisle Scheme
British Government
breweries
pubs
alcohol
ammunition factories
legislation
East end of High Street, Invergordon

This postcard shows the east end of Invergordon High Street, in Easter Ross. The large building to the right is the Royal Hotel. Built during the Victorian era, the hotel was destroyed by fire in 1973.

The Royal Hotel, along with many hotels situated around the Cromarty Firth, came under the legislation of the 'Carlisle Scheme'. During World War I, the British Government took control of pubs and breweries throughout the Cromarty Firth area and the district surrounding Gretna. As these areas had close links to military personnel and ammunition factories, it was considered highly undesirable to have alcohol freely available to those working with explosives. Therefore, the hours of opening within licensed premises was controlled. This legislation ceased in 1971.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

East end of High Street, Invergordon

ROSS: Rosskeen

1910s; 1920s

postcards; hotels; Carlisle Scheme; British Government; breweries; pubs; alcohol; ammunition factories; legislation

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the east end of Invergordon High Street, in Easter Ross. The large building to the right is the Royal Hotel. Built during the Victorian era, the hotel was destroyed by fire in 1973. <br /> <br /> The Royal Hotel, along with many hotels situated around the Cromarty Firth, came under the legislation of the 'Carlisle Scheme'. During World War I, the British Government took control of pubs and breweries throughout the Cromarty Firth area and the district surrounding Gretna. As these areas had close links to military personnel and ammunition factories, it was considered highly undesirable to have alcohol freely available to those working with explosives. Therefore, the hours of opening within licensed premises was controlled. This legislation ceased in 1971.