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Looking towards Ben Wyvis from Invergordon High Street

This postcard shows a view of Ben Wyvis from the west end of Invergordon High Street, in Easter Ross. The ornate building to the right is Invergordon Town Hall and playhouse. To the right of this is J.G. Legge's Central Stores.

Invergordon was named after Caithness born Sir William Gordon of Embo, who purchased the estate during the 18th century. Previous to this, the settlement was known as Inverbreakie. Although Sir William laid out plans for the building of a town at Inverbreakie, it was his son, Sir John, who brought the plans into action. It was not until the estate passed into the hands of the MacLeods of Cadboll that a harbour was built at Invergordon and the town saw rapid growth.

Invergordon's proximity to the Cromarty Firth has made it an ideal anchorage for ships. Its links with the Royal Navy date back to the 19th century and by the 20th century it was classed as an official base, playing host to the Home Fleet on many an occasion. During World War I Invergordon retained its position as a naval base, providing fuel and water for the Royal Navy.

The naval base at Invergordon finally closed in 1956 but the town saw further development during the 1970s through the oil industry. Its close proximity to North Sea oilfields made the area an ideal location for oilrig construction and maintenance to take place. An aluminium smelter was also based at Invergordon during the 1970's and although this closed just after a decade, it brought major employment to the area. Today, Invergordon is home to Ross and Cromarty Enterprise.

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Looking towards Ben Wyvis from Invergordon High Street

ROSS: Rosskeen

1960s

postcards; mountains; Town Halls; playhouses; cinemas; Sir William Gordon of Embo; Inverbreakie; Sir John Gordon of Embo; MacLeods of Cadboll; Royal Navy; naval base; naval bases; home fleet; First World War; oil; oil industry; oil rigs; aluminium smelter

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Ben Wyvis from the west end of Invergordon High Street, in Easter Ross. The ornate building to the right is Invergordon Town Hall and playhouse. To the right of this is J.G. Legge's Central Stores.<br /> <br /> Invergordon was named after Caithness born Sir William Gordon of Embo, who purchased the estate during the 18th century. Previous to this, the settlement was known as Inverbreakie. Although Sir William laid out plans for the building of a town at Inverbreakie, it was his son, Sir John, who brought the plans into action. It was not until the estate passed into the hands of the MacLeods of Cadboll that a harbour was built at Invergordon and the town saw rapid growth.<br /> <br /> Invergordon's proximity to the Cromarty Firth has made it an ideal anchorage for ships. Its links with the Royal Navy date back to the 19th century and by the 20th century it was classed as an official base, playing host to the Home Fleet on many an occasion. During World War I Invergordon retained its position as a naval base, providing fuel and water for the Royal Navy. <br /> <br /> The naval base at Invergordon finally closed in 1956 but the town saw further development during the 1970s through the oil industry. Its close proximity to North Sea oilfields made the area an ideal location for oilrig construction and maintenance to take place. An aluminium smelter was also based at Invergordon during the 1970's and although this closed just after a decade, it brought major employment to the area. Today, Invergordon is home to Ross and Cromarty Enterprise.