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Strathpeffer and District War Memorial

This photograph shows the Strathpeffer and District War Memorial at the entrance to Fodderty Churchyard. The village of Strathpeffer, in the parish of Fodderty, lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery.

The war memorial was dedicated on 11 November 1933 in honour of those who gave their lives in World War 1. Above the gate to the churchyard, the words, 'To the glory of God. In remembrance' are inscribed on the stonework, while to the left and right of the arch are the dates 1914 and 1918 and the words 'Pro patria' and 'Pro rege'. The metal side-gates each bear the inscription, 'In piam memoriam 1918', and the main gates the words 'Freedom' and 'Peace'. 'Highland memory is long for Highland love is strong' is inscribed on the inner arch. On the other side of the arch is a carving of a clarsach or harp and a Gaelic inscription praising the men who displayed such valour for the sake of their countrymen. In later years, the dates 1939 and 1945 were added to the pillars on either side of the main arch and this memorial has also been used to honour those who died in World War 2.

The outbreak of World War 1 was the beginning of the end for Strathpeffer as a spa resort. When war was declared in August 1914, the village was basking in a heatwave. However, the season quickly petered out as visitors with naval or military commitments had to leave to report for duty. Many of the hotels were requisitioned by the Services, the railway service was suspended and the Spa Pavilion was turned into an American naval hospital. Local young men in the Territorials were called up; few returned. When the war finished, Strathpeffer enjoyed a brief revival but its halcyon era was over.

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Strathpeffer and District War Memorial

ROSS: Fodderty

2000s

Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; war memorials; cemeteries; graveyards; wars; First World War; Second World War; 1st World War; 2nd World War; spas; spa resorts, alternative medicine; complementary medicine; tourism; buildings; architecture

Andrew Taylor

This photograph shows the Strathpeffer and District War Memorial at the entrance to Fodderty Churchyard. The village of Strathpeffer, in the parish of Fodderty, lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. <br /> <br /> The war memorial was dedicated on 11 November 1933 in honour of those who gave their lives in World War 1. Above the gate to the churchyard, the words, 'To the glory of God. In remembrance' are inscribed on the stonework, while to the left and right of the arch are the dates 1914 and 1918 and the words 'Pro patria' and 'Pro rege'. The metal side-gates each bear the inscription, 'In piam memoriam 1918', and the main gates the words 'Freedom' and 'Peace'. 'Highland memory is long for Highland love is strong' is inscribed on the inner arch. On the other side of the arch is a carving of a clarsach or harp and a Gaelic inscription praising the men who displayed such valour for the sake of their countrymen. In later years, the dates 1939 and 1945 were added to the pillars on either side of the main arch and this memorial has also been used to honour those who died in World War 2. <br /> <br /> The outbreak of World War 1 was the beginning of the end for Strathpeffer as a spa resort. When war was declared in August 1914, the village was basking in a heatwave. However, the season quickly petered out as visitors with naval or military commitments had to leave to report for duty. Many of the hotels were requisitioned by the Services, the railway service was suspended and the Spa Pavilion was turned into an American naval hospital. Local young men in the Territorials were called up; few returned. When the war finished, Strathpeffer enjoyed a brief revival but its halcyon era was over.