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TITLE
Loch Carron from North Strome Ferry
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1167
PLACENAME
Lochcarron
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochcarron
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33090
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
Wester Ross
promontories
ferries
castles
Loch Carron from North Strome Ferry

This postcard shows a view of Loch Carron from North Strome. North Strome is a promontory which juts out into Loch Carron, separating the inner and the outer lochs and providing a good vantage point and convenient crossing place. Until 1970 a ferry service operated between North Strome and the village of Stromeferry on the southern shore of the loch.

The ruins of 15th-century Strome Castle can be seen at North Strome. The castle passed to the Camerons of Lochiel and then to the Macdonells of Glengarry before being captured and virtually destroyed by the Mackenzies of Kintail in 1602. The ruin was taken over by the National Trust for Scotland in 1939.

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Loch Carron from North Strome Ferry

ROSS: Lochcarron

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; Wester Ross; promontories; ferries; castles

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Loch Carron from North Strome. North Strome is a promontory which juts out into Loch Carron, separating the inner and the outer lochs and providing a good vantage point and convenient crossing place. Until 1970 a ferry service operated between North Strome and the village of Stromeferry on the southern shore of the loch.<br /> <br /> The ruins of 15th-century Strome Castle can be seen at North Strome. The castle passed to the Camerons of Lochiel and then to the Macdonells of Glengarry before being captured and virtually destroyed by the Mackenzies of Kintail in 1602. The ruin was taken over by the National Trust for Scotland in 1939.