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TITLE
Sunset over the Dornoch Firth at Tain
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1171
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33094
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
Easter Ross
sunsets
coasts
coastlines
firths
towns
burghs
saints
royal charters
market towns
Sunset over the Dornoch Firth at Tain

This postcard shows a sunset at Tain. The town is located on the southern shores of the Dornoch Firth, the most northerly firth on the east coast of Scotland. Tain's coastline consists of a wide stretch of mud or sand flats, within which can be found large quantities of mussels, an ancient source of revenue for the town.

Tain claims to be Scotland's oldest royal burgh. The origin of the name 'Tain' is uncertain but the town's Gaelic name 'Baile Dhubhthaich' indicates its links with Duthus or Duthac, an early medieval saint who was born there.

According to tradition, Tain was granted its first trading privileges by Malcolm Canmore in 1066. Its privileges were later confirmed by James VI in 1587 and extended by Charles II in 1675. Tain's burgh status meant that its merchants were exempt from paying certain types of taxes and Tain flourished as a market town for the whole surrounding area. Today, Tain remains a thriving town with a population of around 4000.

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Sunset over the Dornoch Firth at Tain

ROSS: Tain

1950s

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; Easter Ross; sunsets; coasts; coastlines; firths; towns; burghs; saints; royal charters; market towns

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a sunset at Tain. The town is located on the southern shores of the Dornoch Firth, the most northerly firth on the east coast of Scotland. Tain's coastline consists of a wide stretch of mud or sand flats, within which can be found large quantities of mussels, an ancient source of revenue for the town.<br /> <br /> Tain claims to be Scotland's oldest royal burgh. The origin of the name 'Tain' is uncertain but the town's Gaelic name 'Baile Dhubhthaich' indicates its links with Duthus or Duthac, an early medieval saint who was born there. <br /> <br /> According to tradition, Tain was granted its first trading privileges by Malcolm Canmore in 1066. Its privileges were later confirmed by James VI in 1587 and extended by Charles II in 1675. Tain's burgh status meant that its merchants were exempt from paying certain types of taxes and Tain flourished as a market town for the whole surrounding area. Today, Tain remains a thriving town with a population of around 4000.