Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
Strathpeffer and railway line

This postcard, posted in 1906, shows the railway line approaching the village of Strathpeffer from the Dingwall direction. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort.

As the spa facilities of Strathpeffer became better known, the need for improved transport links became apparent. In 1863 a proposal was made to build a railway line from Dingwall to Kyle of Lochalsh via Strathpeffer but local landowners objected to the proposed route. The original line was diverted about two miles north of Strathpeffer, but this proved increasingly inconvenient. Finally, permission was given for a centrally located station and the new branch line to Strathpeffer pictured here was opened in 1885. When the new line opened, the old station was renamed Auchterneed.

The opening of the new branch line further enhanced the popularity of the village. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'. The railway station was very busy during the summer months and in 1911 the Highland Railway Company built its own hotel, the Highland Hotel. At Aviemore the weekly 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' connected with trains from the south and ran directly to the Spa, stopping only at Dingwall.

The outbreak of World War I marked the beginning of the end for the Spa and its railway line. The 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' stopped after the 1915 season and the Highland Hotel was requisitioned by the military. Strathpeffer never regained its pre-war glory. On 23 February 1946 Strathpeffer Station closed to passengers and on 26 March 1951 it closed completely. However, the station buildings were left standing and in 1980 they were restored and now house the Highland Museum of Childhood and associated shops.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Strathpeffer and railway line

ROSS: Fodderty

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; mineral waters; spring waters; spas; spa resorts; alternative medicine; complementary medicine; railways; railway lines; tourism; museums

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard, posted in 1906, shows the railway line approaching the village of Strathpeffer from the Dingwall direction. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort. <br /> <br /> As the spa facilities of Strathpeffer became better known, the need for improved transport links became apparent. In 1863 a proposal was made to build a railway line from Dingwall to Kyle of Lochalsh via Strathpeffer but local landowners objected to the proposed route. The original line was diverted about two miles north of Strathpeffer, but this proved increasingly inconvenient. Finally, permission was given for a centrally located station and the new branch line to Strathpeffer pictured here was opened in 1885. When the new line opened, the old station was renamed Auchterneed. <br /> <br /> The opening of the new branch line further enhanced the popularity of the village. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'. The railway station was very busy during the summer months and in 1911 the Highland Railway Company built its own hotel, the Highland Hotel. At Aviemore the weekly 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' connected with trains from the south and ran directly to the Spa, stopping only at Dingwall. <br /> <br /> The outbreak of World War I marked the beginning of the end for the Spa and its railway line. The 'Strathpeffer Spa Express' stopped after the 1915 season and the Highland Hotel was requisitioned by the military. Strathpeffer never regained its pre-war glory. On 23 February 1946 Strathpeffer Station closed to passengers and on 26 March 1951 it closed completely. However, the station buildings were left standing and in 1980 they were restored and now house the Highland Museum of Childhood and associated shops.