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Strathpeffer Spa and Ben Wyvis

This postcard shows the village of Strathpeffer with Ben Wyvis behind. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. The valley is sheltered on the north side by Ben Wyvis, and to the west by the mountains of Ross-shire. The narrow ridge of the Cat's Back (Druim Chat) marks its southern boundary. The River Peffery flows eastward into the Cromarty Firth.

Strathpeffer owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885.

Ben Wyvis (from the Gaelic 'Beinn-Uais', meaning 'awesome mountain') is a Munro of 3431 feet (1046 metres). Rising from a wide base, with broad shoulders, to a flat extended top, it really consists of a series of summits, the highest part being known as Glas Leathad Mòr ('great green broad slope').

The mountain is made of Moine schist interleaved with Lewisian Gneiss. Its slopes support a variety of wildlife, with over 170 plant species represented, including the woolly hair moss. Among the animals which live on Ben Wyvis are red and roe deer, the pine marten and mountain hare, while it is also home to the golden plover, grouse, raven and ptarmigan.

Even in the height of summer, the north-facing corries of Ben Wyvis may be flecked with snow. The writer of the New Statistical Account noted in 1838 that "the principal proprietor ... holds his right of possession from his Majesty, on condition of presenting a snow-ball at the court of St James' on any day of the year on which it may be required."

Most visitors to Ben Wyvis approach it from Garve, from where the ascent is comparatively easy. From the summit can be seen the whole of the Moray Firth to the north and east, with the Cairngorms in the south and the Fannich mountains to the west.

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Strathpeffer Spa and Ben Wyvis

ROSS: Fodderty

1920s

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; mineral waters; spring waters; spas; spa resorts; alternative medicine; complementary medicine; tourism; villages; hills; mountains; birds; snowballs; hillwalking; hill walks; climbing; Munros

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the village of Strathpeffer with Ben Wyvis behind. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. The valley is sheltered on the north side by Ben Wyvis, and to the west by the mountains of Ross-shire. The narrow ridge of the Cat's Back (Druim Chat) marks its southern boundary. The River Peffery flows eastward into the Cromarty Firth.<br /> <br /> Strathpeffer owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. <br /> <br /> Ben Wyvis (from the Gaelic 'Beinn-Uais', meaning 'awesome mountain') is a Munro of 3431 feet (1046 metres). Rising from a wide base, with broad shoulders, to a flat extended top, it really consists of a series of summits, the highest part being known as Glas Leathad Mòr ('great green broad slope'). <br /> <br /> The mountain is made of Moine schist interleaved with Lewisian Gneiss. Its slopes support a variety of wildlife, with over 170 plant species represented, including the woolly hair moss. Among the animals which live on Ben Wyvis are red and roe deer, the pine marten and mountain hare, while it is also home to the golden plover, grouse, raven and ptarmigan.<br /> <br /> Even in the height of summer, the north-facing corries of Ben Wyvis may be flecked with snow. The writer of the New Statistical Account noted in 1838 that "the principal proprietor ... holds his right of possession from his Majesty, on condition of presenting a snow-ball at the court of St James' on any day of the year on which it may be required."<br /> <br /> Most visitors to Ben Wyvis approach it from Garve, from where the ascent is comparatively easy. From the summit can be seen the whole of the Moray Firth to the north and east, with the Cairngorms in the south and the Fannich mountains to the west.