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Strathpeffer and the Strathconon hills

This postcard shows a view of Strathpeffer looking west towards the Strathconon hills. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. The valley is sheltered on the north side by Ben Wyvis, and to the west by the mountains of Ross-shire. The narrow ridge of the Cat's Back (Druim Chat), from where this photograph was probably taken, marks its southern boundary. The River Peffery flows eastward into the Cromarty Firth.

Strathpeffer owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885.

The Strathconon hills are made of Moine schist with interleaved slices of Lewisian Gneiss. There is evidence that humans have lived in the Strathconon valley since the Bronze Age but in the 1840s the valley was cleared by its owners, the Balfour family, to make way for sheep. Around 500 people are said to have been displaced, some to neighbouring estates and some to the Black Isle. During the 1850s Strathconon estate became noted for its deer forest.

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Strathpeffer and the Strathconon hills

ROSS: Fodderty

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; mineral waters; spring waters; spas; spa resorts; alternative medicine; complementary medicine; tourism; villages; hills; mountains; Highland Clearances; deer forests; hunting

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Strathpeffer looking west towards the Strathconon hills. Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. The valley is sheltered on the north side by Ben Wyvis, and to the west by the mountains of Ross-shire. The narrow ridge of the Cat's Back (Druim Chat), from where this photograph was probably taken, marks its southern boundary. The River Peffery flows eastward into the Cromarty Firth. <br /> <br /> Strathpeffer owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. <br /> <br /> The Strathconon hills are made of Moine schist with interleaved slices of Lewisian Gneiss. There is evidence that humans have lived in the Strathconon valley since the Bronze Age but in the 1840s the valley was cleared by its owners, the Balfour family, to make way for sheep. Around 500 people are said to have been displaced, some to neighbouring estates and some to the Black Isle. During the 1850s Strathconon estate became noted for its deer forest.