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TITLE
The Three Lochs, Strathpeffer Spa
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1272
PLACENAME
Strathpeffer
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Fodderty
PERIOD
1920s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33198
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
islands
birds
trees
forests
spa resorts
spas
tourism
The Three Lochs, Strathpeffer Spa

This postcard shows a view of three lochs taken from the ridge called the Cat's Back (Druim Chat) near the village of Strathpeffer. The loch in the near distance is Loch Kinellan; that on the far left of the picture is Loch Achilty; and the furthest away loch is Loch Garve.

Loch Kinellan is a small loch which contains a crannog, or small artificial island, on which the Mackenzie family of Seaforth once had a stronghold. This crannog is one of several in Ross and Cromarty; they appear to date from the Iron Age but may have been used as late as the 17th century. Crannogs had a good defensive position as well as an easy supply of fresh water. Investigations on the island in Loch Kinellan have shown that it was lifted above the loch surface by a substructure of timbers. Today the loch is home to various kinds of duck, as well as sand martin, reed bunting and warblers.

Loch Achilty is a 100-acre loch about three miles west of Strathpeffer which contains another, smaller, example of a crannog. The loch is surrounded by birch-clad hills which slope down to the water's edge. It is a good fishing loch, as is Loch Garve, which is similarly tree-lined for the most part. Much of the area is managed today by the Forestry Commission.

Trips into the surrounding countryside were popular with visitors who came to Strathpeffer to 'take the waters' when it was a fashionable Victorian spa resort. Today, Strathpeffer is once more popular with tourists, its large Victorian hotels and guesthouses providing accommodation for visitors touring the Highlands.

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The Three Lochs, Strathpeffer Spa

ROSS: Fodderty

1920s

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; islands; birds; trees; forests; spa resorts; spas; tourism

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of three lochs taken from the ridge called the Cat's Back (Druim Chat) near the village of Strathpeffer. The loch in the near distance is Loch Kinellan; that on the far left of the picture is Loch Achilty; and the furthest away loch is Loch Garve.<br /> <br /> Loch Kinellan is a small loch which contains a crannog, or small artificial island, on which the Mackenzie family of Seaforth once had a stronghold. This crannog is one of several in Ross and Cromarty; they appear to date from the Iron Age but may have been used as late as the 17th century. Crannogs had a good defensive position as well as an easy supply of fresh water. Investigations on the island in Loch Kinellan have shown that it was lifted above the loch surface by a substructure of timbers. Today the loch is home to various kinds of duck, as well as sand martin, reed bunting and warblers.<br /> <br /> Loch Achilty is a 100-acre loch about three miles west of Strathpeffer which contains another, smaller, example of a crannog. The loch is surrounded by birch-clad hills which slope down to the water's edge. It is a good fishing loch, as is Loch Garve, which is similarly tree-lined for the most part. Much of the area is managed today by the Forestry Commission. <br /> <br /> Trips into the surrounding countryside were popular with visitors who came to Strathpeffer to 'take the waters' when it was a fashionable Victorian spa resort. Today, Strathpeffer is once more popular with tourists, its large Victorian hotels and guesthouses providing accommodation for visitors touring the Highlands.