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Sgurr-na-Vullin from Achnasheen

This postcard shows the hill known as Sgurr-na-Vullin, or Sgurr a'Mhuilinn (meaning 'hill of the mill'). It is a complex of five peaks reaching 2845 feet (879 metres) at its highest point and is one of the landmarks on the scenic Dingwall to Kyle railway line.

The photograph has been taken from Achnasheen, a tiny settlement situated at the junction of the roads from Gairloch and from Kyle of Lochalsh on their way east to Inverness. Traditionally these routes were used by cattle drovers crossing the country on their way to market. In the early 19th century roads were built close to the drovers' routes by the engineer Thomas Telford.

The railway came to Achnasheen in 1870 when the Dingwall and Skye Line of the Highland Railway was opened. The railway company built the Achnasheen Hotel right next to the eastbound platform of the station but the building was destroyed by fire in the early 1990s. The railway still operates today but is used mainly by tourists who come to admire the beautiful scenery.

Achnasheen's name comes from the Gaelic for 'field of the storms'. This name may have been acquired because the village sits in the broad valley of the River Bran where there is very little shelter. The village is also known for the Achnasheen Terraces, a good example of glacial outwash deltas which were formed thousands of years ago.

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Sgurr-na-Vullin from Achnasheen

ROSS: Contin

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; Wester Ross; hills; mountains; villages; hamlets; settlements; cattle droving; railways; railroads; railway lines; valleys; Ice Age

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the hill known as Sgurr-na-Vullin, or Sgurr a'Mhuilinn (meaning 'hill of the mill'). It is a complex of five peaks reaching 2845 feet (879 metres) at its highest point and is one of the landmarks on the scenic Dingwall to Kyle railway line. <br /> <br /> The photograph has been taken from Achnasheen, a tiny settlement situated at the junction of the roads from Gairloch and from Kyle of Lochalsh on their way east to Inverness. Traditionally these routes were used by cattle drovers crossing the country on their way to market. In the early 19th century roads were built close to the drovers' routes by the engineer Thomas Telford. <br /> <br /> The railway came to Achnasheen in 1870 when the Dingwall and Skye Line of the Highland Railway was opened. The railway company built the Achnasheen Hotel right next to the eastbound platform of the station but the building was destroyed by fire in the early 1990s. The railway still operates today but is used mainly by tourists who come to admire the beautiful scenery.<br /> <br /> Achnasheen's name comes from the Gaelic for 'field of the storms'. This name may have been acquired because the village sits in the broad valley of the River Bran where there is very little shelter. The village is also known for the Achnasheen Terraces, a good example of glacial outwash deltas which were formed thousands of years ago.