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TITLE
Carbisdale Castle from Invershin Viaduct
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1347
PLACENAME
Culrain
DISTRICT
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kincardine
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33273
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
castles
youth hostels
bridges
viaducts
railway lines
railways
Carbisdale Castle from Invershin Viaduct

This postcard shows a view of Carbisdale Castle overlooking the Kyle of Sutherland. The newest of Scotland's castles, it was built by the Dowager Duchess of Sutherland between 1906 and 1917. Lady Mary Gower married the 3rd Duke of Sutherland as his second wife in 1889. When he died in 1892, he left the bulk of his estate to his widow but the family contested the will. After a settlement was reached, the Duchess built Carbisdale Castle just across the border from Sutherland near Culrain in Easter Ross.

This photograph of the castle was taken from the Invershin Viaduct, also known as the Shin Viaduct or the Oykel Viaduct. It carries the railway line over the Kyle of Sutherland from Culrain to Invershin. Designed by Joseph Mitchell and Murdoch Paterson, it is reputably the longest single box section bridge in Europe.

In 1933 Carbisdale Castle was bought by the shipping magnate Theodore Salvesen. The Salvesen family gifted the castle, its contents and the estate to the Scottish Youth Hostel Association in 1945. Complete with marble statues and magnificent paintings, it is still used as a youth hostel today.

The hill behind Carbisdale Castle was the site of the Battle of Carbisdale in 1650. James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, was leading Royalist troops against the Covenanters, who opposed King Charles I's religious reforms. The Royalists fell into a trap and were routed, hundreds dying of their wounds or drowning in the Kyle of Sutherland. The dead soldiers are said to haunt the castle to this day. Montrose escaped but was captured at Ardvreck Castle, where he had sought shelter. He was executed in Edinburgh. The site of the battle is known locally as the Hill of Lamentation.

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Carbisdale Castle from Invershin Viaduct

ROSS: Kincardine

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; castles; youth hostels; bridges; viaducts; railway lines; railways

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Carbisdale Castle overlooking the Kyle of Sutherland. The newest of Scotland's castles, it was built by the Dowager Duchess of Sutherland between 1906 and 1917. Lady Mary Gower married the 3rd Duke of Sutherland as his second wife in 1889. When he died in 1892, he left the bulk of his estate to his widow but the family contested the will. After a settlement was reached, the Duchess built Carbisdale Castle just across the border from Sutherland near Culrain in Easter Ross. <br /> <br /> This photograph of the castle was taken from the Invershin Viaduct, also known as the Shin Viaduct or the Oykel Viaduct. It carries the railway line over the Kyle of Sutherland from Culrain to Invershin. Designed by Joseph Mitchell and Murdoch Paterson, it is reputably the longest single box section bridge in Europe.<br /> <br /> In 1933 Carbisdale Castle was bought by the shipping magnate Theodore Salvesen. The Salvesen family gifted the castle, its contents and the estate to the Scottish Youth Hostel Association in 1945. Complete with marble statues and magnificent paintings, it is still used as a youth hostel today.<br /> <br /> The hill behind Carbisdale Castle was the site of the Battle of Carbisdale in 1650. James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, was leading Royalist troops against the Covenanters, who opposed King Charles I's religious reforms. The Royalists fell into a trap and were routed, hundreds dying of their wounds or drowning in the Kyle of Sutherland. The dead soldiers are said to haunt the castle to this day. Montrose escaped but was captured at Ardvreck Castle, where he had sought shelter. He was executed in Edinburgh. The site of the battle is known locally as the Hill of Lamentation.