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TITLE
Conon Bridge looking towards Ben Wyvis
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1351
PLACENAME
Conon Bridge
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33277
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
streets
villages
hills
mountains
Conon Bridge looking towards Ben Wyvis

This postcard shows a view down the High Street in Conon Bridge, with Ben Wyvis in the background. The village grew up on the southern bank of the River Conon at its lowest bridging point. The modern village was laid out in 1829 but it has a coaching inn dating back to the 1700s.

There are two bridges across the River Conon at Conon Bridge. The original road bridge was built by Thomas Telford in 1806-09. It survived until 1969 when it was replaced with a wider bridge. There is also a railway bridge, designed by Joseph Mitchell for the Inverness and Ross-shire Railway and opened in June 1862. The village’s railway station re-opened in 2013, having been closed in the 1960s.

The mountain dominating the landscape around Conon Bridge is Ben Wyvis (from the Gaelic 'Beinn-Uais', meaning 'awesome mountain'). It is a Munro of 3431 feet (1046 metres). Rising from a wide base, with broad shoulders, to a flat extended top, it really consists of a series of summits, the highest part being known as Glas Leathad Mòr ('great green broad slope').

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Conon Bridge looking towards Ben Wyvis

ROSS

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; streets; villages; hills; mountains

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view down the High Street in Conon Bridge, with Ben Wyvis in the background. The village grew up on the southern bank of the River Conon at its lowest bridging point. The modern village was laid out in 1829 but it has a coaching inn dating back to the 1700s.<br /> <br /> There are two bridges across the River Conon at Conon Bridge. The original road bridge was built by Thomas Telford in 1806-09. It survived until 1969 when it was replaced with a wider bridge. There is also a railway bridge, designed by Joseph Mitchell for the Inverness and Ross-shire Railway and opened in June 1862. The village’s railway station re-opened in 2013, having been closed in the 1960s.<br /> <br /> The mountain dominating the landscape around Conon Bridge is Ben Wyvis (from the Gaelic 'Beinn-Uais', meaning 'awesome mountain'). It is a Munro of 3431 feet (1046 metres). Rising from a wide base, with broad shoulders, to a flat extended top, it really consists of a series of summits, the highest part being known as Glas Leathad Mòr ('great green broad slope').