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TITLE
Torridon village and Loch Torridon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1428
PLACENAME
Torridon
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Applecross
PERIOD
1930s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
33351
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ross-shire
Ross and Cromarty
Wester Ross
roads
villages
hamlets
hill
hills
mountain
lochs
hillwalking
geology
visitor centres
tourism
Torridon village and Loch Torridon

This postcard shows a narrow road winding through Torridon village at the head of Loch Torridon. The village sits at the foot of the Liathach ridge which rises to a height of 3456 feet (1054 metres) at its highest point.

The Torridon group of mountains is one of the highest ranges in Britain and reputed to be among the oldest in Europe. The hills are formed mainly of Torridonian sandstone, with some exhibiting a topping of white quartzite and boulders of Lewisian Gneiss at the base. The area is one of outstanding scenic beauty and popular with hill walkers, photographers, geologists and naturalists. Much of the land in the area belongs to the National Trust for Scotland which runs a visitor centre at Torridon.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Torridon village and Loch Torridon

ROSS: Applecross

1930s

postcards; Ross-shire; Ross and Cromarty; Wester Ross; roads; villages; hamlets; hill; hills; mountain; lochs; hillwalking; geology; visitor centres; tourism

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a narrow road winding through Torridon village at the head of Loch Torridon. The village sits at the foot of the Liathach ridge which rises to a height of 3456 feet (1054 metres) at its highest point. <br /> <br /> The Torridon group of mountains is one of the highest ranges in Britain and reputed to be among the oldest in Europe. The hills are formed mainly of Torridonian sandstone, with some exhibiting a topping of white quartzite and boulders of Lewisian Gneiss at the base. The area is one of outstanding scenic beauty and popular with hill walkers, photographers, geologists and naturalists. Much of the land in the area belongs to the National Trust for Scotland which runs a visitor centre at Torridon.