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In the classroom

The classroom of Knockbain School which was taken from Kirkhill Parish, 8 miles west of Inverness. This building has been re-constructed in the grounds of the Highland Folk Museum at Newtonmore. The tall desk from which the teacher would have had a good view of the whole room can just be seen in the bottom left hand corner. The easel blackboards were very useful teaching aids and here one stands at the front right of the photograph. These could be moved around from one group of pupils to another and in the composite classes which were normal in the country schools there would usually be more than one.

Other teaching aids can be seen on the back wall and include maps and alphabetical and multiplication tables. The ceiling of the building is high which was thought to provide a healthier atmosphere and the windows were large giving a light airy interior which unfortunately was hard to heat. The classroom can hold 45 children seated at the desks, however, records show that in 1926 there were only 16 pupils using this space and that this was probably normal throughout its life time.

The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.

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In the classroom

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

pre-fabricated; corrugated buildings; corrugated building; classrooms; classroom interiors; timberboard lining; wood lining; desks; desk; blackboard; chalkboard; easel blackboards; alphabetical tables; multiplication tables

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

The classroom of Knockbain School which was taken from Kirkhill Parish, 8 miles west of Inverness. This building has been re-constructed in the grounds of the Highland Folk Museum at Newtonmore. The tall desk from which the teacher would have had a good view of the whole room can just be seen in the bottom left hand corner. The easel blackboards were very useful teaching aids and here one stands at the front right of the photograph. These could be moved around from one group of pupils to another and in the composite classes which were normal in the country schools there would usually be more than one. <br /> <br /> Other teaching aids can be seen on the back wall and include maps and alphabetical and multiplication tables. The ceiling of the building is high which was thought to provide a healthier atmosphere and the windows were large giving a light airy interior which unfortunately was hard to heat. The classroom can hold 45 children seated at the desks, however, records show that in 1926 there were only 16 pupils using this space and that this was probably normal throughout its life time.<br /> <br /> The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.