Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Loch Coruisk and Loch Scavaig, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2304
PLACENAME
Loch Scavaig
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34204
KEYWORDS
loch
mountains
landscape
tourism
Loch Coruisk and Loch Scavaig, Skye

This rather unusual view from the slopes above Loch Coruisk, shows very little of the famous loch itself. Instead, the camera faces south west into Loch Scavaig, past the tidal island of Eilean Reamhar (thick, or fat, island) and the headland Rubh' a' Gheodha Bhuidhe (promontory of the yellow creek). The island of Soay lies in the background, with Rum just visible on the horizon to the left. Visitors unable or unwilling to make the long trek to Coruisk are transported by boat from Elgol across Loch Scavaig to a landing spot about a quarter of a mile from Coruisk. The River Scavaig can be seen leaving the southern shore of Loch Coruisk to make its way across the eroded rock sill and the short distance to the sea

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Loch Coruisk and Loch Scavaig, Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1920s; 1930s

loch; mountains; landscape; tourism

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This rather unusual view from the slopes above Loch Coruisk, shows very little of the famous loch itself. Instead, the camera faces south west into Loch Scavaig, past the tidal island of Eilean Reamhar (thick, or fat, island) and the headland Rubh' a' Gheodha Bhuidhe (promontory of the yellow creek). The island of Soay lies in the background, with Rum just visible on the horizon to the left. Visitors unable or unwilling to make the long trek to Coruisk are transported by boat from Elgol across Loch Scavaig to a landing spot about a quarter of a mile from Coruisk. The River Scavaig can be seen leaving the southern shore of Loch Coruisk to make its way across the eroded rock sill and the short distance to the sea