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TITLE
Evening over Glamaig, Broadford
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2373
PLACENAME
Broadford
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1910s; 1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34280
KEYWORDS
mountains
publisher
Evening over Glamaig, Broadford

The postcard has been titled Evening over Glamarg, rather than Glamaig, but otherwise this view from Broadford on Skye remains much the same. The company which produced the card was started by Raphael Tuck. He arrived in Britain with his family in 1865, from East Prussia and over the next few years, along with three sons, developed a very successful publishing company, leaders in the field of quality publishing, producing greetings cards, calendars and books as well as postcards. Adolph Tuck was one of the chief campaigners for the introduction by the Post Office of a larger format postcard, 5.5ins x 3.3ins, which allowed publishers more space to depict their scenes. By 1904, Tuck and sons had 15,000 postcards in print, but in December 1940 the company's premises in London were destroyed in an air raid and all their records were lost.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Evening over Glamaig, Broadford

INVERNESS: Strath

1910s; 1920s

mountains; publisher

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The postcard has been titled Evening over Glamarg, rather than Glamaig, but otherwise this view from Broadford on Skye remains much the same. The company which produced the card was started by Raphael Tuck. He arrived in Britain with his family in 1865, from East Prussia and over the next few years, along with three sons, developed a very successful publishing company, leaders in the field of quality publishing, producing greetings cards, calendars and books as well as postcards. Adolph Tuck was one of the chief campaigners for the introduction by the Post Office of a larger format postcard, 5.5ins x 3.3ins, which allowed publishers more space to depict their scenes. By 1904, Tuck and sons had 15,000 postcards in print, but in December 1940 the company's premises in London were destroyed in an air raid and all their records were lost.