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TITLE
Dunvegan Hotel and the MacLeod Tables, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2417
PLACENAME
Dunvegan
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duirinish
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34323
KEYWORDS
hotel
mountains
loch
McLeod
Dunvegan Hotel and the MacLeod Tables, Isle of Skye

The stone fronted Dunvegan Hotel looks across the long inner arm of Loch Dunvegan to the distinctive flat topped hills of Healabhal Mhor (468m) on the right, and Healabhal Bheag (488m), known as MacLeod's Tables. Their name derives not only from their appearance, but from the tale concerning one of the Clan MacLeod chiefs, Alasdair Crotach. Having enjoyed a fine meal on a visit to a Royal Palace, a lowland nobleman confronted MacLeod rather patronisingly, asking him whether he had ever seen such a grand setting on Skye. MacLeod retorted that indeed, he had a much grander hall and table on Skye, and proceeded to invite the nobleman to visit. When the visit took place, the nobleman was led up to Healabhal Mhor, where a splendid feast was laid out beneath the starry sky. He was forced to admit that the setting far exceeded anything in the south.

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Dunvegan Hotel and the MacLeod Tables, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Duirinish

1920s

hotel; mountains; loch; McLeod

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The stone fronted Dunvegan Hotel looks across the long inner arm of Loch Dunvegan to the distinctive flat topped hills of Healabhal Mhor (468m) on the right, and Healabhal Bheag (488m), known as MacLeod's Tables. Their name derives not only from their appearance, but from the tale concerning one of the Clan MacLeod chiefs, Alasdair Crotach. Having enjoyed a fine meal on a visit to a Royal Palace, a lowland nobleman confronted MacLeod rather patronisingly, asking him whether he had ever seen such a grand setting on Skye. MacLeod retorted that indeed, he had a much grander hall and table on Skye, and proceeded to invite the nobleman to visit. When the visit took place, the nobleman was led up to Healabhal Mhor, where a splendid feast was laid out beneath the starry sky. He was forced to admit that the setting far exceeded anything in the south.