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TITLE
The Setting Sun, Loch Scavaig, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2426
PLACENAME
Elgol
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34332
KEYWORDS
mountains
landscape
loch
The Setting Sun, Loch Scavaig, Isle of Skye

The views of the Cuillin mountains on Skye from the west coast of the Strathaird peninsula are stunning at any time of day and in any weather, and worth the time spent on the meandering single track road from Broadford to Elgol. Rising straight from the sea, Gars-Bheinn (895m,2936 ft) lies at the end of the main Cuillin ridge, the southernmost peak in the range, with views from the top down to Loch Coruisk on one side and Soay Sound on the other. Seen here in silhouette in the setting sun, it is hard to distinguish the island of Soay on the left of Gars-Bheinn, from Rubh' an Dùnain, the promontory behind which separates Loch Brittle from Loch Scavaig

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The Setting Sun, Loch Scavaig, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1920s

mountains; landscape; loch

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The views of the Cuillin mountains on Skye from the west coast of the Strathaird peninsula are stunning at any time of day and in any weather, and worth the time spent on the meandering single track road from Broadford to Elgol. Rising straight from the sea, Gars-Bheinn (895m,2936 ft) lies at the end of the main Cuillin ridge, the southernmost peak in the range, with views from the top down to Loch Coruisk on one side and Soay Sound on the other. Seen here in silhouette in the setting sun, it is hard to distinguish the island of Soay on the left of Gars-Bheinn, from Rubh' an Dùnain, the promontory behind which separates Loch Brittle from Loch Scavaig