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TITLE
Mist on Sgurr Nan Gillean. The Pinnacle Ridge, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2528
PLACENAME
Sligachan
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1930s; 1940s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34435
KEYWORDS
mountains
climbing
landscape
Mist on Sgurr Nan Gillean. The Pinnacle Ridge, Skye

The distinctive cone of Sgurr nan Gillean, at 964m (3165 feet) the fifth highest peak in the Cuillin, features on many photographs and is an iconic image of Skye, which perhaps explains why it was one of the first of the Cuillin to be climbed. Professor James D. Forbes and local ghillie Duncan MacIntyre reached the summit in 1836 along the south-east ridge. It is now known as the Tourist Route, rather inappropriately, as the final 30 metres or so to the exposed tiny summit are not for the faint hearted or poorly equipped rambler. The Pinnacle Ridge pictured is an even more serious proposition involving sustained climbing, however the extensive views from the top, on a clear day, are truly spectacular

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Mist on Sgurr Nan Gillean. The Pinnacle Ridge, Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1930s; 1940s

mountains; climbing; landscape

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The distinctive cone of Sgurr nan Gillean, at 964m (3165 feet) the fifth highest peak in the Cuillin, features on many photographs and is an iconic image of Skye, which perhaps explains why it was one of the first of the Cuillin to be climbed. Professor James D. Forbes and local ghillie Duncan MacIntyre reached the summit in 1836 along the south-east ridge. It is now known as the Tourist Route, rather inappropriately, as the final 30 metres or so to the exposed tiny summit are not for the faint hearted or poorly equipped rambler. The Pinnacle Ridge pictured is an even more serious proposition involving sustained climbing, however the extensive views from the top, on a clear day, are truly spectacular