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TITLE
Sligachan Hotel and Sgurr-Nan-Gillean, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2540
PLACENAME
Sligachan, Sconser
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1900s; 1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34446
KEYWORDS
hotel
mountains
river
climbers
mountaineering
Sligachan Hotel and Sgurr-Nan-Gillean, Skye

Even in black and white, this early postcard conveys the dramatic location of the Sligachan Hotel, with the backdrop of the snow-covered Cuillin mountains. Originally located about half a mile from the current site, Sligachan was an isolated droving inn situated at the ford of the river where it flowed into Loch Sligachan, and at the junction of the roads from Dunvegan and Portree to Broadford. The present building, still without near neighbours, dates from the 1830s, with the original barely noticeable at the centre of several additions and alterations.

Sligachan became the centre for climbing enthusiasts in the mid-19th century and by the 1880s the hotel was attracting many high profile mountaineers including the Pilkington brothers of the St Helens glass manufacturing family. They and other experienced Alpine climbers returned regularly to test themselves on the nearby peaks of the Cuillin range. Professor Norman Collie is perhaps the most well known climber associated with Sligachan. He first came to Skye around 1886 and pioneered many routes on the mountains, along with local crofter and Scotland's most renowned mountain guide, John MacKenzie. Collie's love of Skye was such that he spent his last years staying at Sligachan Hotel and when he died there in 1942, was buried at Struan churchyard, alongside his climbing companion, MacKenzie.

Although Glen Brittle and the hostel there later came to prominence as a base for exploring the Cuillin, Sligachan Hotel, now with a camp site alongside, remains a popular centre for visitors to Skye

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Sligachan Hotel and Sgurr-Nan-Gillean, Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1900s; 1910s

hotel; mountains; river; climbers; mountaineering

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

Even in black and white, this early postcard conveys the dramatic location of the Sligachan Hotel, with the backdrop of the snow-covered Cuillin mountains. Originally located about half a mile from the current site, Sligachan was an isolated droving inn situated at the ford of the river where it flowed into Loch Sligachan, and at the junction of the roads from Dunvegan and Portree to Broadford. The present building, still without near neighbours, dates from the 1830s, with the original barely noticeable at the centre of several additions and alterations.<br /> <br /> Sligachan became the centre for climbing enthusiasts in the mid-19th century and by the 1880s the hotel was attracting many high profile mountaineers including the Pilkington brothers of the St Helens glass manufacturing family. They and other experienced Alpine climbers returned regularly to test themselves on the nearby peaks of the Cuillin range. Professor Norman Collie is perhaps the most well known climber associated with Sligachan. He first came to Skye around 1886 and pioneered many routes on the mountains, along with local crofter and Scotland's most renowned mountain guide, John MacKenzie. Collie's love of Skye was such that he spent his last years staying at Sligachan Hotel and when he died there in 1942, was buried at Struan churchyard, alongside his climbing companion, MacKenzie.<br /> <br /> Although Glen Brittle and the hostel there later came to prominence as a base for exploring the Cuillin, Sligachan Hotel, now with a camp site alongside, remains a popular centre for visitors to Skye