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TITLE
Sligachan Burn and Sgurr nan Gillean, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2570
PLACENAME
Sligachan
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34473
KEYWORDS
mountains
Cuillin
JD Forbes
Sgurr nan Gillean
Sligachan Burn and Sgurr nan Gillean, Isle of Skye

This colour postcard is a much photographed scene, shown here in lovely summer sunshine, but equally dramatic on a wild winter' day. Sligachan has long been considered the mountaineering centre of Skye, with climbers, walkers and spectators making this area a base to explore the Cuillin. The very recognizable steep cone that is Sgurr nan Gillean is prominent at the north end of the Black Cuillin, and was first climbed in 1836 by local ghillie Duncan MacIntyre and James Forbes, Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University. The route they took has become known as the Tourist Route, but presents a hard scramble at the final ascent that requires care and nerve

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Sligachan Burn and Sgurr nan Gillean, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1950s

mountains; Cuillin; JD Forbes; Sgurr nan Gillean

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This colour postcard is a much photographed scene, shown here in lovely summer sunshine, but equally dramatic on a wild winter' day. Sligachan has long been considered the mountaineering centre of Skye, with climbers, walkers and spectators making this area a base to explore the Cuillin. The very recognizable steep cone that is Sgurr nan Gillean is prominent at the north end of the Black Cuillin, and was first climbed in 1836 by local ghillie Duncan MacIntyre and James Forbes, Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University. The route they took has become known as the Tourist Route, but presents a hard scramble at the final ascent that requires care and nerve